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Fall 2013 - Summer 2015 Undergraduate Catalog

Fall 2013 - Summer 2015 Undergraduate Catalog


 








About NMHU

New Mexico Highlands University
Box 9000, Las Vegas, New Mexico 87701
505.425.7511   www.nmhu.edu

New Mexico Highlands University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, 312.263.0456; 800.621.7440, fax 312.263.7462; www.ncacihe.org. To review or receive a copy of the Highlands University’s NCA Affiliation Status Report, please contact the Registrar’s Office.

New Mexico Highlands University reserves the right to change its instructional programs at any time. The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and New Mexico Highlands University. Course descriptions in this catalog are correct at the time of publication. See the Course Schedule for updates to courses.

New Mexico Highlands University does not discriminate on the basis of disability, race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, or sexual orientation in employment, admission, programs or services.

Any student who feels he or she has been discriminated against is encouraged to file an incident report form with the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. For more information, please refer to the Highlands University Student Handbook or the NMHU website at www.nmhu.edu/handbook.

All Highlands University educational programs and activities will be made accessible to students with disabilities upon request.

Individuals with a disability who need accommodations to participate in our programs may contact the University at 505.454.3252, or in writing to the Office of Accessibility Services, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico 87701.

Retention and graduation rate information can be obtained from the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Research at www.nmhu.edu/Institutional_Research/enrollment.aspx.

General Catalog

Fall 2013—Summer 2015

This catalog is published in one version containing undergraduate and graduate sections.

Published biennially by New Mexico Highlands University,
Box 9000, Las Vegas, New Mexico 87701.
Send change of address to NMHU Office of the Registrar.

President

James A. Fries, Ph.D
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM  87701

Board of Regents

  • The Honorable Susana Martinez, Governor of New Mexico, Santa Fe
  • Leveo V. Sanchez, Chairman, Santa Fe
  • Jesus Lopez, Vice Chairman, Las Vegas
  • Nancy R. Long, Member, Santa Fe
  • Frank Marchi, Member, Albuquerque
  • Michael Martinez, Student Regent

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Graduate and Undergraduate Majors, Minors, Concentrations, and Certificates

Undergraduate Major/Minors/Concentration and Certificates

College of Arts and Sciences

  • Major in General Engineering (AS)
  • Major in Social and Behavioral Science (AA)
  • Major Biology (BA/BS)
  • Minor in Biology with concentration in Teaching
  • Minor in Biology
  • Major Biochemistry (BA)
  • Major Chemistry (BA/BS)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Forensics
    • Minor in Chemistry
  • Major General Science Degrees for Secondary School Teachers (BA)
  • Minor in General Science for Elementary School Teachers
  • Major in Computer Science and Mathematical Modeling (BS)
  • Major in Computer Science (BA/BS)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Software/Hardware (BS)
    • Information Systems (BA)
  • Major in Computer Science with an Individualized Concentration (BA/BS)
  • Major in Mathematics (BA/BS)
  • Major in Math and Computer Science for Secondary School Teachers (BA)
  • Minor in Computer Science Concentration in Software/Hardware Systems
  • Minor in Mathematics
  • Minor in Math and Computer Science for Elementary School Teachers
  • Minor in Physics
  • Minor in Cognitive Science
  • Minor in Combined Science
  • Major in English (BA)
  • Minor in English
  • Minor in English Writing
  • Major in Human Performance and Sport (BA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Physical Education
    • Recreational and Sport Management
  • Minor in Human Performance and Sport
  • Minor in Coaching
  • Minor in Recreation
  • Major in Health (BA)
    • With the following tracks:
    • Health Education
    • Health Promotion and Wellness
    • Pre-Professional Allied Health
    • Pre-Processional Athletic Training
  • Minor in Health
  • Major in History (BA)
  • Minor in History
  • Major in Political Science (BA)
    • With an Emphasis in:
    • Liberal Arts
    • Law
  • Minor in Political Science
  • Major in History with a Concentration in Social Studies, Secondary Teaching (BA)
  • Minor in Social Studies, Secondary Teaching
  • Major in Spanish (BA)
  • Major in Spanish for Elementary and or Secondary School Teachers (BA)
  • Minor in Spanish
  • Minor in Native American/Hispano Cultural Studies
  • Major in Forestry (BS)
    • With concentrations in:
    • Forestry Management
    • Wildland Fire
  • Major in Geology
    • Environmental Geology Concentration
    • Water Resources Degree Track
    • Environmental Science Degree Track
  • Minor in Environmental Science
    • Certificates in the following:
    • GIS (Geographical Information Systems)
    • Forest and Watershed Restoration
  • Minor in Geology
  • Major in Nursing (BSN)
  • Major in Psychology (BA/BS)
  • Major in Sociology and Anthropology (BA)
    • With an emphasis in the following:
    • “American Indian Studies
    • Anthropology
    • Criminology
    • Sociology
  • Minor in Anthropology
  • Minor in Psychology
  • Minor in Sociology
  • Major in Fine Art Pre-Professional (BFA)
  • Major in Interdisciplinary Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
  • Major in Fine Art Liberal Arts (BA)
  • Major in Music (BA)
    • With concentrations in:
    • Music Education (BA)
    • Music Technology and Composition (BA)
    • Vocal Performance (BFA)
    • Minor in Art Studio Emphasis
    • Minor in Art History
    • Minor in General Music
    • Minor in Music Technology and Composition

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School of Business, Media Arts and Technology

  • Bachelors in Business Administration (BBA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Accounting
    • Finance-Managerial Finance
    • Management
    • Marketing
    • Media Marketing
    • Oil and Gas Management
    • General Business
  • Minor in Accounting for Non-Business Majors
  • Minor in Accounting for Business Majors
  • Minor in Business
  • Minor in Finance for Non-Business Majors-Managerial Finance
  • Minor in Finance for Business Majors
  • Minor in Management for Non-Business Majors
  • Minor in Management for Business Majors
  • Minor in Marketing for Non-Business Majors
  • Minor in Marketing for Business Majors
    • Certificates in the following:
    • Accounting
    • Finance
    • Human Resource Management
    • Media Marketing (BA/BFA)
  • Major in Media Arts (BFA)
  • Major in Software Systems Design (BSSD)
  • Minor in Software Systems Design (BSSD)

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School of Education

  • Major in Early Childhood Multicultural Education
  • Minor in Early Childhood Multicultural Education
  • Major in Elementary Education
  • Minor in Bilingual Education TESOL
  • Minor in English as a Second Language (ESL)
  • Minor in Secondary Education
  • Major in Special Education (BA)
    • Certificates in the following:
    • Secondary Certificate Program Leading to Licensure
    • Special Education Certificate Program Leading to Licensure

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School of Social Work

  • Major in Social Work (BSW)

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Graduate Programs and Certificates

College of Arts and Sciences

  • Master of Science in Chemistry (MS)
  • Master of Science in Natural Science (MS)
  • Master of Arts of Science in Media Arts and Computer Science (MA/MS)
  • Master of Arts in English (MA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Literature
    • Linguistics, Literacy and Composition
    • Creative Writing
  • Master of Arts in Human Performance and Sport (MA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Teacher Education
    • Sports Administration
  • Master of Arts in Public Affairs
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • History
    • Political and Governmental Processes
    • Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
  • Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (MA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • History/Political Science
    • Hispanic Language and Literature
    • Hispanic Language and Literature
  • Natural Resource Management
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Biology
    • Environmental Science and Management
    • Geology
    • Certificate in the following:
    • GIS
  • Master of Arts in Public Affairs (MA)
  • Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (MA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Anthropology
    • Applied Sociology
  • Master of Science in Psychology (MS)
    • With tracks in
    • General Psychology
    • Clinical/Counseling
  • Certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM)
  • Certificate in Fine Arts
  • Dual Degrees in Business and Social Work (MBA and MSW)

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School of Business, Media Arts and Technology

  • Master of Business (MBA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Accounting
    • Finance
    • International Business
    • Human Resource Management
    • Management
    • Marketing
    • Oil and Gas
  • Certificates in the following:
    • Accounting
    • Finance
    • Human Resource Management
  • Master of Arts or Science in Media Arts and Computer Science (MA/MS)
  • Master of Arts Degree in Software Driven Systems Design (MSSD)
    • Certificate in the following:
    • Media Marketing

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School of Education

  • Master of Arts in Education (MA)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Curriculum and Instruction
    • Educational Leadership
    • Special Education
    • Counseling
      • With emphasis in:
      • Professional Counseling
      • School Counseling
      • Rehabilitation Counseling
    • Concentration in Vocational Evaluation Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling
      • With an emphasis in the following:
      • Vocational Evaluation
  • Certificates in the following:
    • Professional Counseling
    • Rehabilitation Counseling
    • Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services
    • Reading
    • TESOL (Teaching English as a Second Language)
    • Bilingual Education
    • Advanced Placement
    • Educational Leadership
    • Secondary Certificate Program Leading to Licensure

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School of Social Work

  • Master of Social Work (MSW)
    • With concentrations in the following:
    • Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice
    • Leadership and Administration
  • Dual Degree, MSW/MBA
  • Certificate in Substance Abuse (Albuquerque campus only)

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Vision Statement

New Mexico Highlands University will provide an inspiring multicultural learning environment that promotes excellence, empowerment, transformation, and global understanding.

Mission

Education through teaching, research, and service.

Core Values

  • Advancement of knowledge
  • Student success
  • A diversity of ideas
  • Accessible education
  • Community
  • Individual well-being
  • Sustainable practices
  • Multiculturalism

The 2013-2015 General Catalog is a description of New Mexico Highlands University’s policies, undergraduate and graduate academic programs and courses of instruction. Although much effort has been made to ensure accuracy, errors or omissions may be present. All official corrections to this catalog are on file with the Office of the Registrar. The General Information and Policy section of this catalog are continuously updated on Highlands’ website, www.nmhu.edu. Course descriptions in this catalog are correct at the time of publication. See the Course Schedule for updates to courses.

The administration and faculty of New Mexico Highlands University believe the educational programs of the University are effective and valuable. However, the ultimate results of the programs offered – in terms of achievement, employment, and professional licensing – are also dependent on factors beyond the control of the University, such as individual student initiative, governmental or institutional regulations, and market conditions. Therefore, New Mexico Highlands University makes no representation or guarantee that following a particular course or curriculum will result in specific achievement, employment, admission to other programs, or professional licensing.

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Admissions

Admission to Undergraduate Studies

Felix Martinez Building Room 160
505.454.3434/3439/3503
E-mail: admissions@nmhu.edu

Applying for Admission

An application can be obtained from the Highlands University Office of Admissions or from New Mexico high school counselors. Applications are also available on our web page at: www.nmhu.edu/admissions, where a student can also apply online.

Applicants must submit the following for a complete application:

  • Application form;
  • A $15, nonrefundable, one-time application fee;
  • Official transcripts sent to the Highlands University Admissions Office;
  • Beginning May 2013, high school applicants must submit American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores. Students may be admitted to the University without test scores but will not be able to enroll.

All documents should be submitted to the Admissions Office at the address above.

Applications for undergraduate admission will be considered at any time; however, to ensure timely action on the application, students are advised to submit the completed application materials during the following suggested filing periods:

  • For fall semester, previous November-August
  • For spring semester, previous July-December
  • For summer session, previous January-June

Send the completed application to the Office of Admissions accompanied by a $15, one-time, nonrefundable check or money order made out to New Mexico Highlands University (or NMHU). Do not send cash. Official transcripts and test scores should be sent to the same address.

Timely application for admission is essential to process applications for financial assistance or scholarships. Students are advised to consult the appropriate sections of this catalog for information about application procedures and deadlines concerning financial assistance at Highlands University.

Only students who have been admitted to Highlands University are allowed to register for classes.

Admission Criteria (Subject to Change)

New Freshmen

New Mexico Highlands University considers admission for beginning freshmen who:

  • submit a completed Highlands University undergraduate application for admission;
  • pay a $15, one-time, nonrefundable application fee;
  • submit official transcripts indicating high school diploma from an accredited secondary school or successful completion of the national GED examination. (Admission may be given to qualified high school seniors who have not yet graduated, subject to their submitting a transcript verifying their graduation before beginning studies at the university.); and
  • take the required American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) prior to enrolling for courses at Highlands University. Submission of score reports at the time of application is suggested. Students may be admitted to the University without test scores but will not be able to enroll.

Admissions Status

Students are admitted into regular, probationary, or non-degree status as follows:

Regular Admission

  • An earned high school diploma, a high school grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale); and
  • ACT/SAT scores (not required for admission but required prior to enrollment); or,
  • In lieu of a high school diploma, students will qualify for regular admission with a GED average score of 450. The GED transcript can be requested from www.diplomasender.com; and
  • ACT/SAT scores (high school applicants: not required for admission but required prior to enrollment).

Probationary Admission

Probationary admission is considered for students who do not meet the criteria for regular admission. Students whose grade point average is below a 2.0 may be admitted on probationary status. Probationary-status students must also submit ACT/SAT test scores prior to enrollment and might be subject to special requirements for academic performance in their freshman year. Freshman students admitted on academic probation are expected to earn a satisfactory GPA in either their first or second semester at Highlands University or be subject to dismissal. The satisfactory semester GPA for all freshmen is 1.75.

The review process: An application from any student whose high school grade point average is below a 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is reviewed. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the applicant’s motivation for college work and likelihood of success. Additional information from an applicant, such as a personal statement of educational goals and recommendations from secondary school personnel, is welcome.  Students applying for probationary admission might be required to submit such information or to attend an advisory session with university personnel before being admitted in this status.

Non-Degree Undergraduate Admission

Non-degree admission enables students to pursue credit courses without meeting all of the requirements for admission to a degree program. Non-degree status is available for those who wish to pursue university courses for personal interest or professional development, for visiting students enrolled in a degree program at another college or university but seeking to complete some courses at Highlands University for transfer, or for other similar types of applicants.

Non-degree admission may also be used by students who lack a high school diploma or GED and are at least 18 years old. These students may apply for regular admission status upon completion of high school or GED. Non-degree admission may also be given in certain circumstances to enable a student to enroll while a regular admission application is pending. Students admitted in non-degree status are not eligible for financial assistance.

Transfer Students

New Mexico Highlands University considers for admission undergraduate students as transfers from other regionally accredited colleges and universities who:

  • pay a $15, one-time, nonrefundable application fee;
  • submit a completed application for undergraduate admission; and
  • send a complete, official transcript from each previously attended college or university to the Highlands University Admissions Office. Students under academic suspension or dismissal from another college or university may not be admitted until they have served the required suspension at that institution.

Applications will not be processed until all the required items are in file with the Office of Admissions.

Admission Status

Transfer students are admitted into regular, probationary, or non-degree status as follows:

  • Transfer students who have completed fewer than 16 semester credit hours of postsecondary schooling will be treated the same as new freshmen in the admissions process (see above). These students must submit their high school transcripts (or GED records), ACT or SAT scores if taken, and college/university transcripts.
  • Transfer students who have completed 16 or more semester credit hours of postsecondary schooling will be admitted in regular status provided they have at least a C or 2.0 cumulative grade point average in all college or university course work.
  • Degree-seeking probationary admission will be considered for transfer students with a cumulative grade point average below C through the individual review process as defined for probationary admission.
  • Transfer students are also eligible for non-degree admission status.

Home School or Nonaccredited Schools

Students (16 years or older) who have been home schooled or who have attended a nonaccredited school, are required to submit an official school transcript, and official score reports from the ACT or SAT prior to enrollment at the University. Letters of recommendation and a personal statement of goals and objectives are not required but can be helpful in the admissions review. All applicants will be reviewed on an individual basis for admissions.

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Transfer of Credits

New Mexico Highlands University accepts academic credits for transfer from institutions of higher education that are regionally accredited or are candidates for regional accreditation. Transfer students will receive full credit for coursework completed with an appropriate grade, provided the classes are appropriate to a degree at the university. Transfer course grades will not be calculated as part of Highlands University grade point average and are listed on the academic transcripts with a grade of CR. (However, for graduation, all transfer credits graded are included in the final computations for honors.) Highlands University does not award transfer credit for vocational, technical, or remedial courses and credits awarded for work or life experience. Students transferring from an accredited institution of higher education may transfer under one of the following plans:

Course by Course

The course-by-course plan is for students who do not plan to complete an associate degree. The Course Articulation Matrix compiled by the Higher Education Department and transfer guides in place with New Mexico two-year colleges serve as a guide for this purpose and apply to General Education requirements only.

Degree Completion

Students who are transferring with an earned associate of arts (AA) or associate of science (AS) degree from a New Mexico regionally accredited institution of higher education will have New Mexico Highlands University proficiency, extended core, state core and minor requirements waived. Education majors have special requirements that may preclude waiver of some university requirements. Please consult the appropriate section of the catalog. Students who are transferring with an earned associate of arts (AA) or associate of science (AS) degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education from outside New Mexico will have New Mexico Highlands University proficiency, extended core, and minor requirements waived. Students may be responsible for fulfilling the state-mandated core requirements. An associate of applied science (AAS) degree does not waive university proficiency, extended core and minor requirements. All other university requirements, including the university’s state-mandated 35-hour common core, program, residency, and the 45 upper-division credit requirements must be met before granting of the baccalaureate degree.

An individual transfer analysis will be given to the student by the admissions and registrar’s offices to determine courses required for completing the university’s general education requirements. Major and minor program requirements will be reviewed by officials in the appropriate department. Students must complete all courses required by Highlands University and meet the university’s requirements for academic performance to receive the indicated degree.

Transfer Among New Mexico Higher Education Institutions

To facilitate transfer of students and course credits among New Mexico’s colleges and universities, the state’s public institutions of higher education are required to accept transfer courses taken within approved modules of lower-division coursework and apply them toward degree requirements.

Several transfer guides have been developed through collaboration of New Mexico’s public postsecondary institutions, consistent with requirements of state law (21-1B, NMSA 1978). Students enrolling for first-year or second-year study at a New Mexico institution and wishing to prepare for possible transfer into a degree program at another institution are advised to take these courses during their freshman and sophomore years.

Student Responsibility

New Mexico’s colleges and universities have collaborated to produce guides to assist students who plan to transfer before completing a program of study. Course modules are designed to help students prudently select courses so they can transfer with little or no loss of credit. However, planning for effective transfer with maximum efficiency is ultimately the student’s responsibility. Responsible transfer planning includes early and regular consultation with the intended degree-granting institution to ensure all pre-transfer coursework will meet the requirements of the desired degree.

Transferring Courses to Fulfill the New Mexico General Education Common Core

In accordance with policies established by the New Mexico Higher Education Department, designated general education core courses successfully completed at any regionally accredited public institution of higher education in New Mexico are guaranteed to transfer to any New Mexico public institution. Students who have decided on a major and/or an institution to complete their studies should consult with an academic adviser at that particular institution to determine the most appropriate course selections. Students enrolling for the first-year of study at a New Mexico college or university and considering possible transfer into a certificate and/or degree program at another institution are encouraged to take the courses approved for transfer during their freshman and sophomore years of study.

The core matrix of approved courses guaranteed to transfer and meet general education requirements at any New Mexico college or university can be found on the New Mexico Higher Education Department website at www.hed.state.nm.us/institutions/general-ed-core-course-transfer-curriculum.aspx. Courses in the state core matrix are listed by institution under each of the five general education areas.

The following are the approved courses for New Mexico Highlands, with their equivalent New Mexico common course number:

NMHU Common

NM Common

Core Classes

Course Number

Area I Communications (9 hours)

ENGL 111 Freshman Composition 1

Engl 1113

ENGL 112 Freshman Composition 2

Engl 1123

MART 124 Public Speaking 

Comm 1113

 

 

Area II Mathematics (3 hours)

MATH 130 Math for Elementary Teachers  2

Approved for majors in education only

MATH 140 College Algebra

Math 1113

MATH 145 Introduction to Statistics

Math 2113

MATH 150 Trigonometry

Math 1213

MATH 211 Calculus 1

Math 1613

 

 

Area III Lab Science (8 hours)

BIOL 110 Biological Perspectives 

Biol 1114

BIOL 211 General Biology 1

Biol 1214

BIOL 212 General Biology 2

Biol 1224

BIOL 131 Human Biology

Biol 2414

CHEM 100 Chemistry for the Non-Scientist

Chem 1114

CHEM 211/215L General Chemistry 1

Chem 1214

CHEM 212/216L General Chemistry 2

Chem 1224

GEOL 101 Survey of Earth Science

Geol 1214

PHYS 105 Elementary Physics 

Geol 1214

PHYS 151 Algebra Physics 1

Phys 1114

PHYS 152 Algebra Physics 2

Phys 1124

PHYS 291 Calculus Physics 1

Phys 1214

PHYS 292 Calculus Physics 2

Phys 1224

 

 

Area IV Social And Behavioral Sciences (6-9 Hours)

ANTH 102 Intro to Sociocultural Anthropology 

Anth 2113

ANTH 103 Intro to Physical Anthropology/Archaeology

Anth 1113

ECON 216 Principles of Macroeconomics

Econ 2113

ECON 217 Principles of Microeconomics 

Econ 2123

POLS 151 American National Government

PolS 1123

PSY 101 Psychology & Society 

Psyc 1113

SOC 152 Introductory Sociology

Soci 1113

 

 

Area V Humanities/Fine Arts (6-9 hours)

HIST 100 The Western World

Hist 1053

HIST 201 US History to 1865 

Hist 1113

HIST 202 US History from 1865

Hist 1123

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy

Phil 1113

ART 100 Introduction to Art 

Art 1013

MUS 100 Introduction to Music

Mus 1013

MUS 101 Rudiments of Music  

Mus 1213

THEA 100 Introduction to Theater 

Thtr 1013

New Mexico Common Core Numbers

The course prefix and number that appear on the right-hand side next to the NMHU course number is the New Mexico common course number. This is a four alpha – four numeric set of uniform course designations serving as a single reference point for courses sharing substantially equivalent content taught throughout the state. Courses bearing this designation are part of a statewide equivalency table that cross-references the institutional course and number with a universal common course number creating an easy one-to-one match.

Students can find the New Mexico common course number listed in degree outlines, transfer guides, and in course descriptions in college catalogs and websites. Simply put, the common course number connects equivalent courses at multiple institutions assuring students that the course will transfer to the receiving institution and meet degree requirements as if it were taken on that campus.

Lower-Division 64-Hour Transfer Modules

Students who have selected a field of study but have not yet selected the college or university where they wish to earn their baccalaureate degree are advised to take courses during their freshman and sophomore years outlined in one of the lower-division 64-hour transfer modules. For students enrolled at any public institution in New Mexico, these courses are guaranteed to transfer to any New Mexico university and apply toward bachelor’s degree program requirements. Students should consult advisers at their current institutions regarding which specific classes fit these categories. Lower-division transfer modules presently exist for:

  • Business
  • Teacher education
  • Early childhood education

Modules for additional areas of study are being developed. 

Interinstitutional Transfer Guides and Catalogs

Students who have selected a field of study and/or the institution where they wish to graduate are advised to consult the transfer guide or catalog for that institution for current and detailed advice to guide their course selection. Transfer guides between most New Mexico Community Colleges and Highlands University are available through the Highlands University Admission’s Office.

Complaint Procedure for Transfer Students

All New Mexico public postsecondary institutions are required to establish policies and practices for receiving and resolving complaints from students or other complainants regarding the transfer of coursework from other public institutions in the state. A copy of New Mexico Highlands University’s complaint policy may be obtained from the Admission Office or from the New Mexico Higher Education Department at 1068 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501-4295, 505.476.8404 or http://hed.state.nm.us.

Military Credit

The university grants credit for military education or service schools on the recommendation of the American Council on Education’s Publication Guide to Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services. A DD214, DD295, or official military transcript form is required to consider credit for military service. Air Force veterans are required to provide an academic transcript from the Community College of the Air Force.

Training Credit

Credit for noncollegiate training programs is granted based on recommendation of the American Council of Education’s National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs and institutional policies. Official records must be provided to the university.

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Early Admission Program

Students who are still in high school may be admitted under one of the following plans:

Regular Admission – High school students who have demonstrated maturity and academic success may enroll at Highlands University after their high school junior year in lieu of completing high school. To qualify for this special program, students must have:

  • a strong motivation to enter the university and social, emotional, and intellectual maturity;
  • a high school grade point average of at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale;
  • an ACT score in at least the 70th percentile (nationwide norms), or a comparable SAT score;
  • recommendation letters from at least two high school officials and the permission of the high school administration; and
  • a letter of permission from a parent or legal guardian.

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Dual Credit/Concurrent Enrollment

High school students may begin college work at Highlands University by taking some college courses while completing their final high school credits for graduation. To qualify for this program, students must meet the following requirements:

  • High school junior or senior status.
  • Seniors in their final semester must have a grade point average of at least 2.0. Juniors must have a 3.0 grade point average.
  • Have an admissions application, an official academic transcript and have parent/school signatures on the Dual Credit /Concurrent form.
  • Take the Compass® exam or provide ACT scores.

Students who are interested in exploring these early-admission programs should contact the Educational Outreach Services for assistance: 505.425.2058 or toll free at 877.248.9854. Students who have previously attended only need to provide parent permission and school permission by obtaining signatures on the appropriate form.

Parents are responsible for the tuition of students in the concurrent enrollment program.

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International Students

A statement of the detailed procedures for admission of international students is available from the International Education Center, international_ed@nmhu.edu. International students must be formally admitted to the university before the verifications required for the F-1 student visa can be issued. For detailed information, contact the International Education Center, International_ed@nmhu.edu

To write or call from outside the United States:

International Education Center
New Mexico Highlands University
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM, 87701, USA

Telephone: 001.505.454.3372
Fax: 001.505.454.3511

International students may not apply through the university website. They must submit a paper application. The following is required for international students who seek admission to Highlands University:

Applicants are expected to give evidence of an adequate command of the English language by earning a satisfactory score on any of the following English tests:

TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)

Composite score =

  • 500 Paper based
  • 173 Computer based
  • 61 Internet based

IELTS (International English Language Testing System) = Band 5.5

Step Eiken (Test in Practical English Proficiency) = Pre-1

For students applying to the School of Business, Media and Technology:

TOEFL Scores =  

  • 540 Paper based
  • 207 Computer based  
  • 76 Internet based

IELTS Band 6.0

Step Eiken Pre -1

Information regarding testing may be obtained from:

TOEFL Services
Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, USA
609.771.7100 or 877.863.3546 (Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m. Eastern Time (New York), except for U.S. holidays)

609.771.7714 – TTY (24 hours a day, seven days a week for test takers who are deaf or hearing impaired)

www.toeflgoanywhere.org

IELTS 

www.ielts.org/contact_us.aspx

Step Eiken

www.eiken.or.jp/

www.stepeiken.org/forms/contact-form

All international students who seek graduate admission to Highlands University must submit a completed and signed application along with all required documents, nonrefundable $15 USD application fee. Some programs might require additional documentation for consideration.

Applicants must submit the completed Financial Certificate form and official bank statements along with the application to New Mexico Highlands University before immigration documents can be issued to the admitted applicant.

All international student applications must be received from the country or the current residence of the applicant, no exceptions.

Applicants from other countries in which English is an official language, but not the language of the majority or of instruction will be subject to these requirements. Exceptions for providing evidence of adequate command of the English language are:

  • Holding citizenship in English-speaking countries.
  • Holding citizenship in a country where the English language is an official language and the means of instruction.

Applicants must:

  • Possess the equivalent of a United States high school diploma (for admission as new freshmen) or be a transfer student from an approved university or college outside the United States. Transcripts and other valid records of previous schools attended should come from national examination councils (where applicable), approved colleges or universities, or other official state or federal agencies for education. These records will be evaluated for compliance with the admissions criteria of the university;
  • Pay a $15 (U.S.), one-time, nonrefundable application fee;
  • Submit the completed financial certificate for international admission to issue the I-20 form.

International students who are not currently studying in the United States are not required to submit ACT or SAT scores. However, if such test has been taken by an international student, it is highly recommended that the scores be reported to New Mexico Highlands University.

International students who are currently attending a high school in the United States and will be attending Highlands University as a first time freshman are required to submit ACT or SAT scores.

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Advanced Credit Programs

Highlands University offers a number of advanced credit options to earn course credit prior to becoming a freshman at NMHU.

College Board Advanced Placement Examinations

Highlands University recognizes student academic accomplishment on the advanced placement examination. Highlands University follows the current guidelines of the American Council on Education regarding the granting of credit for Advanced Placement (AP). Highlands University grants credit for AP scores of 3 or higher on any AP examination. Three semester hours will be granted for the following half-year AP courses: Computer Science; Economics – Macro and Micro; Forestry; Government and Politics – Comparative and U.S.; Physics – Mechanics; Psychology; and Statistics. Six semester hours will be granted for full-year courses other than mathematics, sciences, and foreign languages, which earn eight semester hours.

CLEP Examinations

CLEP General Examination scores of 450 or higher will earn credit with a maximum of four semester credits in each of the five examinations, for a maximum total of 20 credits. These credits may apply both to general education and elective credit, but their use in degree programs is subject to faculty approval.

Credit will be granted in CLEP subject examinations to both newly admitted and regularly enrolled students who earn grades of 45 or higher, as approved by appropriate academic schools.

ACT/SAT Test Score Placement

Students must take the American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) prior to enrolling for classes at Highlands University. Submission of test scores at the time of application is highly recommended.

ACT/SAT scores are used to place students in the following composition courses:

ACT English = 0 – 16, student is placed in ENGL 106 Reading and Writing for Inquiry. This course does not count toward graduation requirements.
ACT English = 17 – 27, student is placed in ENGL 111 Freshman Composition I. This course counts toward graduation requirements.

SAT Writing = 420, student in placed in ENGL 111 Freshman Composition I.
ACT English = 28 +, student is placed in ENGL 112 Freshman Composition II, and receives credit for ENGL 111.

Exceptional scores on the American College Test (ACT) earns advanced credit according to the following table:

ACT Topic                     Score                Credits Awarded
English                         31-36                 6
                                       28-30                 3

Mathematics               31-36                  6
                                      29-30                  3

These credits automatically apply toward elective credits for graduation. Whether they may be applied toward general education requirements or in degree programs is subject to limitations established by the appropriate disciplines.

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Admission to the University – Graduate

Office of Graduate Studies
Rodgers Administration, Room 108

505.454.3266

E-mail: graduate@nmhu.edu

The application for admission is available on our website, www.nmhu.edu

Degree-Seeking Students

Students wishing to receive a master’s degree must apply for, and be admitted in, degree-seeking status. Admission may be granted in one of the following categories:

Regular Status

This status is assigned to an applicant who meets all the requirements for admission to graduate study:

  • A 3.0 grade point average;
  • A bachelor’s degree;
  • The required background in the area of proposed study;
  • The required transcripts;
  • The required test scores; and,
  • All other requirements identified by the discipline.

Provisional Status

Students who lack one or more of the above criteria may be admitted in this status. An attachment to the letter of admission will show the conditions to be satisfied before the applicant may be assigned to regular status.

A maximum of 24 graduate credits may be earned in this status. Students may not submit a graduate program of study while in this status.

Typical conditions to be satisfied include the following:

  • GPA: When a student’s grade point average in his or her undergraduate studies is below 3.0, he or she must complete the first 12 graduate credits and earn a GPA of 3.0 or better. Certain programs may require that the student earn at least a B in each class of the first 12 credits.
  • Bachelor’s degree: A student who is in his or her last semester of undergraduate work at another accredited institution may be admitted in provisional status pending receipt of the bachelor’s degree. The transcript showing conferral of the undergraduate degree must be received by midterm of the first semester of enrollment in graduate study.

First-Time Graduate Applicants From Other Institutions

Students who are in their last semester of undergraduate study at another institution may apply and receive provisional admission. However, the transcript showing conferral of the undergraduate degree must be received by midterm of the first semester of enrollment in graduate study.

First-Time Graduate Applicants From NMHU

Students who are in their last semester of undergraduate study but not within 12 semester credits of receiving their bachelor’s degree may apply for admission and be assigned to this status. While students in this status may not enroll for graduate courses, they may apply and compete for scholarships or other opportunities requiring admission to a graduate program. Students should consult with the Financial Aid Office to determine the impact, if any, of this status. See the section, below, on advanced standing status.

Advanced Standing

Students who are within 12 semester credits of receiving their bachelor’s degree may apply for and be admitted to a graduate program. This status limits enrollment at the graduate level to nine credits. If the undergraduate requirements are not met, the student must reapply for advanced standing each semester.

If, upon conferral of the undergraduate degree, other stipulations for regular admission must be satisfied, the status will change to “provisional” until all conditions have been met. If no other conditions have been assigned to the student’s admission, then the status will be changed to “regular.”

In cases where requirements are disputed, the Academic Affairs Committee will render a final decision, upon the recommendation of the adviser, graduate program coordinator/department chair/ and the college/school dean.

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Non-Degree Status

Non-degree status is principally for those who do not expect to work toward an advanced degree at Highlands University. Any person who has an earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and is in good standing at the last university attended may be admitted as a non-degree graduate student. Application for non-degree status may be made at the time of registration. In the application, non-degree applicants certify that they possess a bachelor’s degree and are in good standing at the last university attended. Applicants are required to have an official copy of the transcript showing the award of the bachelor’s degree sent to the Office of the Registrar before the end of the first semester of registration.

Credits earned as a non-degree graduate student will require the same quality and amount of work as similar credits earned in advanced-standing, provisional, and regular graduate status. Up to 12 semester credits earned as a non-degree graduate may be applied toward a master’s degree, on the condition that the student was eligible for regular status at the time the courses were taken, the courses are acceptable to the discipline, and the approval of the chief academic officer, the Office of Graduate Studies, is obtained. A petition to apply non-degree credits toward a degree will be accepted only after the student has been admitted into a graduate program.

Non-degree students may not take a graduate course unless they would be eligible for that course as regular or provisional graduate students. Non-degree students are not eligible for financial assistance. Students in a licensure track may be eligible for loans.

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General Graduate Admission Requirements

This section of the General Catalog states Highlands University’s general graduate admission policies. Additional information may be required or recommended, and separate procedures or deadlines may be established for specific graduate programs. Applicants must consult the section of the catalog that describes the particular graduate program of interest to them. General admission requirements include:

  • The completed Graduate Application for Admission, the $15 one-time, nonrefundable application fee, two letters of recommendation, and the required essay must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies. At the same time, applicants also must have official transcripts of all previous college work sent to the same office. Admission cannot be complete until all of these materials have been received in an acceptable form. Application packets are available from the Office of Graduate Studies.
  • A new application is required for re-enrollment after a five-year absence. Students applying for readmission to the university after a five-year absence or more may be required to resubmit transcripts or other admissions materials. New Mexico state law allows the university to destroy student records five years after the last term attended. The director of admissions (undergraduate) or the Graduate Admissions Office will determine what materials, if any, the student will need to resubmit.
  • If a second master’s degree or a change in major or concentration outside the college/school is sought, a new application is required, and entrance requirements for that program must be met. No work used toward the first master’s degree may count toward the second degree.
  • It is strongly recommended that applicants for a master’s program in psychology take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Although test scores are not required for other programs, they may be submitted.
  • The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of foreign student applicants.
  • Graduate students must have an earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher learning and present an acceptable undergraduate program (or evidence of comparable achievement) in the field(s) in which they intend to do graduate work.

Applicants are admitted on the basis of individual evaluation of transcripts and other supporting documentation. With the exception of minimum grade point average, requirements vary among the various graduate programs. Examples are:

  • Applicants to the graduate program in English must submit a 10- to 15-page writing sample, preferably a scholarly paper written for an upper-division English class.
  • Applicants to the media arts and computer science graduate programs must provide a portfolio with examples of academic, industrial or creative work. 

Undergraduate credit requirements in the field of study are flexible; an undergraduate minor is usually adequate. Quality and breadth of coverage are the critical factors in determining the adequacy of undergraduate preparation. At least a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average must have been earned in the field(s) of the proposed graduate program.

Applicants may submit additional information in support of their applications (and may be required to do so for certain programs). In disputed cases, the final decision of whether the undergraduate preparation is adequate is determined by the discipline to which the student is applying, the dean of the college, the Faculty Academic Affairs Committee and the vice president for academic affairs. Other admissions considerations may include:

  • The discipline, the appropriate dean, the Academic Affairs Committee, or the chief academic officer, Office of Graduate Studies, may require additional verification of eligibility for graduate work such as letters of recommendation and/or special examinations.
  • All applicants approved for a graduate degree program are admitted as regular or provisional graduate students. Provisional students may gain regular student status by meeting the criteria stated at the time of admissions.
  • Students who are within 12 semester credits of completing the requirements for a bachelor’s degree but otherwise meet the requirements for admission as graduate students may, upon the recommendation of the appropriate dean, be granted advanced standing, permitting enrollment in certain graduate courses while the bachelor’s work is being completed. A maximum of nine credits may be earned in this status.
  • Students who are completing the last semester of their undergraduate work but do not qualify for advanced-standing status may be granted provisional admission. Consideration will be given to applicants who otherwise meet the requirements for admission to graduate study. Students in this status may not register for graduate courses. This status is intended for the sole purpose of allowing students to compete for scholarships or other opportunities requiring admission to a graduate program.
  • Provisional graduate status may be granted to students with a bachelor’s degree who, for reasons beyond their control, are not able to meet the timetable for admission to a graduate program. In the application, students certify that they possess a bachelor’s degree and are in good standing at the last university attended. Admission files must be completed by the middle of the first semester in attendance or students will be subject to disenrollment for that semester.
  • Students who have an undergraduate grade point average below 3.0 or who are deemed to have course deficiencies in their major field may be admitted provisionally on the condition they earn and maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average for the first 12 semester credits of graduate work. This admission is granted upon the recommendation of the discipline and appropriate dean and with the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee.
  • Students with a bachelor’s degree who wish to earn a master’s degree in a field unrelated to their undergraduate work may arrange a special program of undergraduate and graduate courses to qualify for the advanced degree. Such a program could involve work comparable to a minor undergraduate program, and must be arranged in consultation with the discipline and dean concerned and the chief academic officer, Office of Graduate Studies.
  • Students whose undergraduate work was done in the United States must have earned a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution or an institution that is a candidate for regional accreditation. In rare cases, students might have graduated from institutions that are not accredited. In these cases, admission must be approved by the discipline to which the student is applying, the dean of the college, the Faculty Academic Affairs Committee, and the vice president for academic affairs.
  • Transcripts and other valid records of previous colleges or universities attended should come from national examination councils (where applicable), approved colleges or universities, or other official state or federal agencies for education. These records will be evaluated for compliance with the admissions criteria of the university.

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International Students

Students whose undergraduate work was not done in the United States must submit evidence of having received a degree equivalent to the requirement for domestic students. Normally this will consist of a degree earned in an institution approved by national examination councils (where applicable), approved by colleges or universities or other official state or federal agencies for education. No exceptions will be considered, and this requirement is not subject to review.

Applicants are expected to give evidence of an adequate command of the English language by earning a satisfactory score on any of the following English tests:

TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)

Composite score =

  • 540 Paper based
  • 207 Computer based
  • 76 Internet based

IELTS (International English Language Testing System) = Band 6.5

Step Eiken (Test in Practical English Proficiency) = Pre-1

Information regarding testing may be obtained from:

TOEFL Services

Educational Testing Service

P.O. Box 6151

Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, USA

1.609.771.7100 or 1.877.863.3546 (Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m. Eastern Time (New York), except for U.S. holidays)

1.609.771.7714 – TTY (24 hours a day, 7 days a week for test takers who are deaf or hearing impaired)

www.toeflgoanywhere.org

IELTS 

www.ielts.org/contact_us.aspx

Step Eiken

www.eiken.or.jp/

www.stepeiken.org/forms/contact-form

All international students who seek graduate admission to Highlands University must submit a completed and signed application along with all required documents, nonrefundable $15 USD application fee. Some programs may require additional documentation for consideration.

Applicants must submit the completed Financial Certificate form and official bank statements along with the application to New Mexico Highlands University before immigration documents can be issued to the admitted applicant.

All international student applications must be received from the country or the current residence of the applicant, no exceptions.

Applicants from other countries in which English is an official language, but not the language of the majority or of instruction will be subject to these requirements. Exceptions for providing evidence of adequate command of the English language are:

  • Holding citizenship in English-speaking countries.
  • Holding citizenship in a country where the English language is an official language and the means of instruction.

All international applicants must:

  • Be formally admitted to the university before the verifications required for the F-1 student visa can be issued.

All international students who seek graduate admission to Highlands University must meet additional conditions: Along with the submission of the completed Graduate Application for Admission, the required essay, two letters of recommendation, and the nonrefundable $15 application, the student:

  • Submit the completed financial certificate for international admission.

For more information contact the International Education Center at:

International Education Center
New Mexico Highlands University
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM, 87701, USA

Telephone: 001.505.454.3372
Fax: 001.505.454.3511

International_ed@nmhu.edu

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Tuition, Fees And Financial Policies

Summary of Regulations for New Mexico Residency for Tuition Purposes

A student who enters and remains in New Mexico principally to obtain an education is presumed to continue to reside outside this state, and such presumption continues in effect until rebutted by clear and convincing evidence of bona fide residence. A student determined to be financially dependent on a parent or guardian also assumes the residency of that parent or guardian. The burden of proof is on the student. The student must secure and file the petition with the appropriate documents of evidence in the manner described herein. All documents submitted for this purpose will be kept confidential.

To become a legal resident of New Mexico, four requirements must be met by the student. Each person must meet the requirements individually.

  • The 12-month consecutive presence requirement;
  • The financial independence requirement;
  • The written declaration of intent requirement;
  • The overt acts requirement.

Permanent residents must present their valid 10-year I-551 form and establish 12 consecutive months of being a New Mexico resident before applying for in-state residency.

The person, his or her spouse and dependent children of a person who has moved to New Mexico and has obtained permanent full-time employment (sufficient documentation is required) shall not be required to complete the 12-month duration requirement. A person, his or her spouse, and dependents who move to New Mexico for retirement purposes and who provide appropriate evidence of formal retirement shall not be required to complete the 12-month duration requirement.

Other relevant factors may be considered along with those listed above.

A reciprocity agreement between Colorado and New Mexico allows Highlands University to grant a waiver of the nonresident portion of tuition charges to a limited number of students from Colorado. Each student requesting such a waiver must complete the proper application and return it to the Office of the Registrar as early as possible. The application must be submitted no later than the second Friday of classes for the fall or spring semester. The Registrar’s Office reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing.

All enrolled out-of-state members of an American Indian nation, tribe and pueblo shall be eligible for in-state tuition rates. For specific information, please contact the Office of Admissions or Registrar’s Office.

A brochure explaining all requirements for establishing New Mexico residency and residency petitions is available from the Office of the Registrar. Residency petitions will be accepted until the first day of each semester in the Office of the Registrar. For more information, call 505.454.3233.

Semester And Summer Sessions

Tuition and fees are subject to change, the specific amounts charged for tuition and fees are listed each semester or summer session in the published schedule of classes. Students are advised to check the most current schedule. The schedule of classes is also available at https://banweb.nmhu.edu. The following rates are the 2014-2015 tuition rates. Rates may increase upon approval by the Board of Regents. These figures are provided to help students plan.

Tuition rates are effective with summer session and apply to fall and spring. Summer tuition rates may reflect approved tuition and fee increases from those of the school year before.

Nonrefundable Special Fees

  • Application fee (one-time): $15
  • Matriculation fee (one-time): $5
  • Graduation application fee (each degree): $50
  • Dishonored check fee $25
  • Laboratory fees: Variable
  • Housing application fee: (total fee is $200)
  • Special exam (test-out) fee, per credit: $40
  • Career placement fee, per year (renewal only; first year free): $15
  • Transcript fee: $5
  • Transcript – Fax charge: $5

Special Policies Regarding Tuition and Fees

Payments and Accounts

Account balances must be paid according to the plans listed in the schedule of classes. Students with financial assistance should verify their award prior to the payment deadline.

Account balances that are not paid within the semester will be sent to a collection agency. Holds will be placed on the student’s account, restricting transcripts and registration for upcoming semesters. Payments can be made via the Highlands University website www.nmhu.edu or mailed to NMHU Cashier’s Office, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM  87701.

The Business Office accepts cash, checks, money orders, credit cards (MasterCard, Visa and Discover), wire transfers, financial aid awards, and written authorizations to bill external agencies to cover balances.

Disenrollment Policy

Highlands University students who fail to pay their full required tuition and fee charges or make adequate financial arrangements with the Business Office on or before their first day of classes will have their registration cancelled and will be disenrolled from all classes by the second week of the term. Students with a cancelled registration who wish to be enrolled at Highlands University must contact the business office to reregister. The student will be required to make full payment or complete financial arrangements for all incurred charges including a nonrefundable reregistration fee of $25 and a billing fee of $25. Please see schedule of classes or www.nmhu.edu for deadlines.

Payment Plan/Procedure       

The New Mexico Highlands University Business Office offers students the following payment options:

  1. Students must pay their account in full or make adequate financial arrangements.
  2. Adequate financial arrangement option:

Full-term semester courses:  

  • 1/3 payment prior to or on the first day of class attendance
  • 1/3 payment 30 days thereafter
  • 1/3 payment 30 days following second payment

Summer or eight-week courses:

  • 1/2 payment prior to or on the first day of class attendance
  • 1/2 payment 30 days thereafter

A $25 billing fee will be assessed to the student’s account if the account is not paid in full by the Monday before the first day of classes.

For more information on payment options, contact the Business Office at 505.454.3222, 505.454.3444 or 505.454.3008, sar@nmhu.edu or write to:

Business Office
New Mexico Highlands University
Rodgers Administration Building
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701

Withdrawal Policies

Students who officially withdraw from the university may be entitled to a tuition refund according to specific dates announced in the schedule of classes for the term. Upon completion of the formal withdrawal process, a check will be mailed to the student within one month following the complete withdrawal from school if a refund is appropriate.

Students who wish to request an exception to the refund policy must do so in writing at the Business Office.

Tuition Refund Schedule

  • First day of class: 100% refund
  • 10% point in semester: 90% refund
  • 25% point in semester: 50% refund
  • 50% point in semester: 25% refund
  • Thereafter: No refund

For more information on withdrawal policies, payment options or tuition rates, contact the Business Office.

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Financial Aid and Scholarships

Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships
Felix Martinez Building, Suite 240
505.454.3318 or toll free 800.379.4038
E-mail: financialaid@nmhu.edu

As part of our mission, New Mexico Highlands University is committed to ensuring that no student will be denied the opportunity for a postsecondary education because of limited resources. To meet this goal, the New Mexico Highlands University Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships offers a broad spectrum of academic merit scholarships, grants, work-study jobs, and loans to supplement the resources of eligible students who attend Highlands University. We provide Highlands University students with the timely delivery of financial assistance while maintaining accountability and proper stewardship of the public, institutional, and private funds with which it is entrusted. We are committed to providing courteous service to support the academic mission and goals of the University and its students.

Financial aid at Highlands University is divided into three categories:

  • Grant aid (applicable towards first degree only)
  • Self-help aid (employment and loans)
  • Scholarships (merit and need based)

The Financial Aid Package

The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships awards financial aid according to individual need and eligibility criteria. If a student is a dependent, parents are expected to contribute toward educational costs according to their financial ability. In addition, students are expected to contribute from their own assets and earnings, including borrowing against future income. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attendance at Highlands University (including living expenses) and the expected family contribution (EFC). The aid package cannot exceed financial need or cost of attendance.

To apply for financial aid:

  1. Complete all sections of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
  2. For priority consideration, applications should be received by March 1. The Highlands University school code is 002653. All supporting documentation must be received by April 15.
  3. If transferring into Highlands University during the current academic year, the applicant will also need to access the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov and add NMHU (002653) to the list of schools.  It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that the financial aid file is complete. The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships cannot make a financial aid award if a file is incomplete or if a student is not admitted into a degree seeking program or eligible Title IV program. Web access is available to students 24 hours a day seven days a week at www.nmhu.edu; click on “MY NMHU” and enter secure area to obtain financial aid status.

Once a student’s processed FAFSA is received, the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships will determine if and for how much financial aid an applicant is eligible. The aid awarded is based on the cost of attending Highlands University, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. Dependent care expenses may be considered once the applicant provides the appropriate documentation. Students may also request budget adjustments for the purchase of a personal computer or other unusual educational related expenses. See a financial aid adviser for more information.

To qualify for financial aid at Highlands University, an applicant must:

  1. Demonstrate financial need as determined through a processed FAFSA.
  2. Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen.
  3. Maintain satisfactory academic progress (see standards below).
  4. Be enrolled in a regular degree program (Title IV eligible) at Highlands University.
  5. Be enrolled at least half time (six credit hours) for all aid programs (with the exception of federal Pell Grant, in certain situations).
  6. Not be in default on a federal student loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant. 

Students may use their financial aid awards to defer tuition at the Highlands University Business Office/ Student Accounts once classes are charged to their account and before the awards are disbursed. A student’s award is subject to change if the student becomes ineligible as a result of over-award or failure to maintain academic progress. Students are required to notify the financial aid office if they are receiving aid from ANY other source.

Verification Policy

A student may be required to verify the accuracy of his or her FAFSA. Highlands University verifies between 30 and 50 percent of all financial aid applications. All students who are selected by the Department of Education’s central processing servicer for verification must submit the appropriate documents requested by the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships before the application for aid can be processed. All required documentation must be received by April 15 for priority consideration or no later than three weeks before the end of the semester for which financial aid is requested.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Federal Title IV program regulations require participating institutions to develop procedures to monitor a student’s progress toward completion of their program of study. The following is a summary of the criteria used by the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships to monitor progress:

GPA Requirement For Undergraduate Students

If a minimum GPA as stated below is not met, the result is financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension):

1– 32 attempted hours = 1.75 cumulative GPA

Above 32 attempted hours = 2.0 cumulative GPA

GPA Requirement for Graduate Students

If a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is not met, the result is financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension).

Pace of Progression (Formerly Completion Rate) for Undergraduate Students

To determine the pace of progression, divide the hours completed by hours attempted. Less than the percentage indicated below results in financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension):

1 – 32 attempted hours = 65%

33 – 63 attempted hours = 70%

64 – 95 attempted hours 75%

96 or more attempted hours = 80%

Note: Hours attempted includes all credit hours attempted and completed as well as unsatisfactory grades for example: F, W, U, I, NG, NP, and R.

Maximum Time Frame for Undergraduate Students

Once the maximum hours have been reached, the result is financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension). Students who have reached 125 percent of their degree requirement will be placed on a warning status. Students must appeal this status and provide the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships with a current degree check:

5-year program (must be identified in the catalog as such) = 160 hours x 150% = 240 hours

4-year program = 120 hours x 150% = 180 hours

Associate degree = 64 hours x 150% = 96 hours

Once it is determined that a student cannot obtain their degree within the 150% maximum time frame, financial aid may be denied.

Pace of Progression (Formerly Completion Rate) for Graduate Students

To determine the pace of progression, divide the hours completed by hours attempted. Less than the percentage indicated below results in financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension).

Graduate students must always maintain an 80 percent pace of progression.

Note: Hours attempted includes all credit hours attempted and completed as well as unsatisfactory grades for example: F, W, U,  I, NG,NP, and R.

Maximum Time Frame for Graduate Students

Once the maximum hours have been reached, the result is financial aid ineligibility (warning/ suspension). Students who have reached 125 percent of their degree requirement will be placed on a warning status. Students must appeal this status and provide the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships with a current degree check/ program of study.

Examples of maximum time frame calculations:

  • MSW = 65 credit hours 125% = 81 hours and MTF is 98 hours
  • Counseling = 48 credit hours 125% = 60 hours and MTF is 72 hours
  • Clinical Psychology = 63 credit hours; 125% = 78 hours and MTF is 94 credit hours
  • MBA = 37 credit hours; 125% = 46 hours and MTF is 55 hours
  • Public Affairs, Southwest Studies = 36 credit hours; 125% = 45 hours and MTF is 54 hours
  • Educational Leadership and Curriculum & Instruction = 36 credit hours; 125% = 45 hours and MTF is 54 hours.

These are just a few examples of maximum time frame, however, these calculations will be based on the stated required credit hours as indicated in the catalog and the program in which the student has formally identified as the program of study.

Once it is determined that a student cannot obtain his or her degree within the 150 percent maximum time frame, financial aid may be denied.

Notification and Appeal Process

Students whose GPA and/or credit hours fall below the minimum standards indicated above will be notified at the end of the semester. When notified of financial aid warning/ suspension, the student may file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships. Appeal forms are provided in the letters and are available on our website at http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html. The student may be given a probationary semester with financial aid to make up deficiencies in GPA and/or credit hours and meet the minimum standards. If at the end of the probationary semester the student still does not meet the minimum requirements, the student will lose his or her financial aid and must make up the deficiencies to regain financial aid eligibility. By federal regulation, a student CAN NOT be on suspension two consecutive semesters. A student who continues coursework at Highlands University is personally responsible for tuition and fee charges with no assistance from federal aid programs and must meet the minimum standards as established in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards.

Enrollment Requirements for Financial Aid

Undergraduate students must be enrolled for a minimum of 12 credits each semester to be eligible for full financial aid: 9-11 hours is considered 3/4 time and 6-8 hours is considered 1/2 time. 

Summer course load requirements for financial aid are a minimum of six credits hours.

Audit and some repeat courses are not eligible for financial aid.

To avoid loss of financial aid, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships before dropping or withdrawing classes.

Summer Financial Aid

Effective summer 2013, summer financial aid will be awarded based on the “trailer” system, which means Highlands University will base eligibility on the prior year FAFSA; i.e., 2012-13 FAFSA will be used for summer 2013 financial aid package. A student who chooses to enroll in the summer term is advised to notify the Financial Aid office of intent to enroll. It is also advised that students conserve their loan borrowing to allow reserve for the summer.

Financial Aid Return of Title IV Funds for Official/Unofficial Withdrawals

The federal return of Title IV policy will be used to calculate the portion of federal financial aid a student is ineligible for and must repay/return to the Department of Education should the student withdraw completely from school (officially or unofficially). This applies to students receiving Federal Direct Stafford Unsubsidized Loan; Federal Direct Stafford Subsidized Loan; Federal Perkins Loan; Graduate PLUS loan; Federal Pell Grant; Federal SEOG; Federal TEACH Grant and/or other Title IV program assistance. For more information, contact the Financial Aid Office at 505.454.3318 or 800.379.4038.

New Mexico Highlands University Undergraduate Scholarship Programs

The Highlands University scholarship program was established to recognize and reward outstanding achievements by entering freshmen, transfer and continuing undergraduate and graduate students. A grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required to compete for a number of our academic-based scholarships. Some scholarships are renewable from one to four years, depending on the academic level at which the student enters Highlands University and the conditions applicable to the individual scholarship. Requirements for full-time status vary for scholarship recipients, but frequently exceed the 12-credit minimum. To apply or obtain information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships or log on to www.nmhu.edu. If the applicant is transferring from another college to attend Highlands University and is a New Mexico Legislative Lottery recipient, a New Mexico Scholarship Transfer Transcript form from all former college(s) should be sent to the NMHU Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Box 9000, Las Vegas, N.M. 87701. The university also awards performing art scholarships through the Department of Communication and Fine Arts. To apply, contact the Department of Communication and Fine Arts. To receive consideration for Highlands University scholarships, the student must be admitted by the following priority deadline dates:

Freshman Scholarships with the March 1 priority deadline are:

  • Presidential Gold
  • Presdiential Silver
  • Ken and Sue Crimmin (scholarship application required)
  • Leveo Sanchez
  • Victoria D. De Sanchez
  • Regents’ NM Scholars
  • Dean’s Scholarship
  • Freshman Success Scholarship
  • College Incentive Grant
  • New Mexico Success Scholarship
  • New Mexico Opportunity Grant

Continuing and Transfer Scholarships

Continuing and transfer students must submit a scholarship application obtainable through the Highlands University website by the May 1 priority deadline date. Transfer students must be admitted in degree status by the priority deadline and have a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Requirements for full-time status vary for scholarship recipients, but frequently exceed the 12-credit minimum.

  • Presidential Scholarship/Presidential Transfer Scholarship
  • Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship
  • General Motors Scholarship
  • Legislative Endowment Scholarship
  • Dean’s Transfer Scholarship

Summer Sessions

Scholarship awards are for the regular academic year fall/spring only and may not be used for the summer session.

Scholarship Cancellation and Reinstatement

The time period for which a scholarship is in effect is fixed. If the scholarship is cancelled due to academic ineligibility, the original specified time period is not extended. Students who are placed on suspension may appeal for consideration for renewal of the scholarship, with the exception of the qualifying semester for the New Mexico Legislative Lottery Scholarship. A written request must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarship within 10 days after receiving the suspension letter or e-mail.

New Mexico Highlands University scholarship restriction: If a student inadvertently receives an offer/award of a second tuition scholarship, the student may only accept and receive one. The student must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarship indicating which scholarship he/she wishes to receive (for student receiving the NM Legislative Lottery scholarship, this will always be the default unless otherwise specified). If notification is not received, the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships will determine which scholarship is beneficial to the student and cancel the second scholarship. Scholarship recipients who receive a dependent tuition waiver are ineligible for the tuition portion of any scholarship award.

Code of Conduct

To ensure the highest ethical standards, the U.S. Department of Education requires a Student Loan Code of Conduct be maintained and published by all financial aid offices.

At Highlands University, we never have and never will:

Accept payment from any outside entity in exchange for loan referrals or preferential treatment.

Accept gifts from an outside entity for loan referrals (a gift is defined as any gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, hospitality, loan, or other item having monetary value of more than a de minimis amount). A gift is NOT a brochure used for default aversion or financial literacy; food, training or informational material provided as part of training to improve services; entrance or exit counseling assistance that does not promote a lender; philanthropic contributions unrelated to loans; or state education grants or scholarships.

  • Accept consulting fees or other contractual financial benefit from a provider of student loans.
  • Intentionally delay certification of loans from any lender or automatically assign students to a particular lender.
  • Accept services or staffing assistance from any outside entity in exchange for referrals or preferential treatment.
  • Accept compensation in exchange for appointments to advisory boards or committees of any entity involved in the processing of alternative student loans.
  • Accept a pool of funds from a lender to establish a university loan in exchange for federal loan referrals.

Other Assistance Programs and Benefits

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)

Each year, the BIA provides grants to assist eligible Native American students in meeting their education costs. The amounts of the grants vary according to the student’s financial need. The funds are available through the student’s BIA area office or tribal scholarship office. Check with the tribal agency to ascertain program requirements and deadlines for application.

Enrollment Certifications for Loan Deferments

Students are usually required to process an enrollment certification to defer payments on an outstanding student loan. The Office of the Registrar certifies enrollment verification forms after classes begin. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar, 505.454.3233.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate assistantships are usually available in disciplines in which graduate degrees are granted. Assistantships are normally offered only to those applicants possessing superior academic abilities. These assistants generally help with classes, laboratory reports, objective examinations, and other tasks within the academic units. Disciplines may also award teaching and research assistantships. Application for an assistantship should be made by March preceding the beginning of the academic year in which the assistantship is to be held. No assistantship may be awarded until the applicant has been accepted into a graduate degree program. Graduate students who hold assistantships and whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 at the end of any semester may, with the advice of the discipline and appropriate dean, have the assistantships revoked by action of the chief academic officer. The following are the procedures and policies governing the selection and employment of graduate assistants at New Mexico Highlands University:

  • In addition to information requested on the graduate application, at least two letters of reference must be submitted on behalf of each applicant.
  • Assistantships are awarded after the applicants have been admitted into a graduate degree program and have been recommended by the discipline, the appropriate dean, and the chief academic officer. Teaching assistants must be specifically approved by the chief academic officer.
  • Full-time assistants are expected to devote approximately 20 hours per week to their duties. Part-time assistants should devote time proportional to the amount of their award.
  • Full-time assistants may not carry more than 12 semester credits of coursework per semester. Overloads are only permitted in exceptional cases and with the approval of the discipline, appropriate dean, and the chief academic officer. Part-time assistants may carry a load proportional to their assistantship responsibilities.
  • Full-time graduate assistants, except in their last semester of work toward the master’s degree, must take at least six credits of graduate work in their degree programs each semester.
  • Other activities by graduate assistants that would interfere with the satisfactory performance of assistantship duties may not be undertaken. While students may have more than one part-time contract, such as a part-time departmental graduate contract, the sum of the contracts and the work required shall not exceed the equivalent of one full-time graduate assistantship (20 hours of work per week).
  • A student who has been admitted to a graduate program, but has not earned a bachelor’s degree prior to his or her first semester of graduate study, may not hold a graduate assistant position.

American Indian Residency

All enrolled out-of-state members of an American Indian nation, tribe and pueblo shall be eligible for in-state tuition rates. For specific information on the forms required, please contact the Admissions Office at 505.454.3439.

Nonresident Tuition Waiver for Colorado Students

A reciprocity agreement between Colorado and New Mexico allows Highlands University to grant a waiver of the nonresident portion of tuition charges to a limited number of students from Colorado. Each student requesting such a waiver must complete an application each semester. The application must be submitted no later than the second Friday of the semester and can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar’s Office reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing.

Nonresident Tuition Waiver for Student Athletes

Senate Bill 81 authorizes resident tuition status for athletic scholarship recipients. To be eligible, the student must be a recruited athlete. The student must also receive an athletic scholarship through the Department of Athletics and complete an athletic waiver form. For more information, contact the Highlands University Department of Athletics, 505.454.3368.

Veterans Administration Educational Benefits

Several programs are available for veterans pursuing a postsecondary education.  Academic programs are approved by the State Approving Agency and are approved for educational benefits by the Department of Veteran Affairs. Contact the Office of the Registrar for details, 505.454.3424.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Through the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the state and federal governments offer tuition assistance to students with disabilities. Other assistance also may be given to those students with disabilities who are financially unable to provide services themselves. Students wishing to apply for this assistance should contact the New Mexico Vocational Rehabilitation Office, 505.425.9365.

Western Undergraduate Exchange Program (WUE)

Highlands University participates in the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) program, which allows students from participating states to attend Highlands at 150 percent of in-state tuition. The application for the WUE program must be submitted no later than the second Friday of the semester to the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar’s Office reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing. For additional information, contact the Office of the Registrar, 505.454.3233.

Workforce Investment Act

The New Mexico Department of Labor (NM Workforce Connection), the state and federal governments offer assistance with tuition, books, supplies, transportation, and child care for those who qualify. For more information and application process, contact the New Mexico Department of Labor, 505.425.6451.

Study Abroad

The International Education Center assists students in applying for study-abroad programs sponsored by Highlands University, the New Mexico Public Universities Consortium, and other cooperating institutions.

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Highlands at a Glance

First established as New Mexico Normal School, the institution became New Mexico Highlands University in 1941 as it expanded its role beyond teacher education. Today, Highlands University in Las Vegas offers graduate and undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, education, and social work. Located in the heart of Las Vegas, a small, friendly town with a population of about 14,000, Highlands’ main campus is close to recreational and wilderness areas and within a few hours of major metropolitan centers.

Through distance education, Internet courses, and on-site instruction, Highlands University also offers some degree-completion and graduate programs in Farmington, Rio Rancho, Española, Santa Fe and Raton.

Although students from all over the world attend Highlands University, most students are from New Mexico and are Hispanic. Enrollment is approximately 3,700 students attending the main campus in Las Vegas and university centers in Albuquerque, Farmington, Santa Fe, Raton, Rio Rancho and Roswell. Highlands’ programs focus on its multiethnic student body, especially the Hispanic and Native American cultures distinctive of New Mexico.

Highlands University continues the traditional role of an institution of higher learning in the liberal arts and sciences as well as comprehensive programs in business, teacher education, and social work. Highlands is committed to excellence in the transmission, discovery, preservation, and application of knowledge itself to maintain a progressive, forward-looking posture responsive to the changing social environment, as to shape the direction the institution will take with respect to anticipated demands and approaching opportunities.

As part of its mission to serve the individual student through personal attention, Highlands maintains open enrollment, small classes, and low tuition. It is known nationwide for its research activities, student and faculty achievement, and opportunities for students to combine study with real-world experience. Highlands University students and faculty consistently receive national and international recognition for many of their achievements and have opportunities to network with other researchers and professionals in their areas of interest.

Student Services

Academic Support

Felix Martinez Building, Room 110, 505.454.3188, AcademicSupport@nmhu.edu

The Office of Academic Support provides academic advisement that empowers and encourages students of all diverse populations to build collaborative relationships with faculty, staff and peers.  Advisers are committed to providing dynamic partnerships that enable trust and mutual respect while supporting a transition to self-directed learning, decision making and student independence.  Adviser and student interactions promote teaching and learning to enhance student success including educational, social and personal development. Services include accessibility, testing, retention, and intervention, new student orientation, and peer advisers who offer weekly events designed for social integration and campus involvement. Services are open to all students.

Bookstore

Student Union Building, Room 101, 505.454.3598, Bookstore@nmhu.edu

The Highlands Bookstore stocks the required course textbooks and offers supplies, gifts, novelty items and access to a fax machine. Regular business hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours of operation are extended during early semester rush periods.

Campus Life and Conferences

Student Union Building, Room 301, 505.454.3590, campuslife@nmhu.edu

Campus Life assists in making student life fun, lively and educational. The office provides a number of services including coordination of university events such as Welcome Week, club fairs, the Student Leadership Recognition Dinner, dances, Family Fun Day, homecoming events, and the Family Holiday Party. Service to student organizations includes charters, a handbook, mailboxes, leadership training programs and scheduling of university facilities. This office also provides student identification card services for university students, staff and faculty, oversees the campus vending operation, and administers the canteen fund. The director of campus life welcomes volunteers to assist with events or to join campus organizations or the Activities Board.

Career Services

Felix Martinez Building, Room 230, 505.454.3048, careerservices@nmhu.edu

The Office of Career Services offers current students a variety of career planning services including job search strategies, resume preparation, interview skills, career fairs, job listings for internships and career opportunities, employer information sessions and on-campus recruitment. Most of these services are also directly available online at www.nmhu.edu/careerservices. All students, including freshmen, are encouraged to utilize these services early in their education. Paid internships offer students the opportunity to gain work experience related to their field of study while in college.

Center for Advocacy Resources Education & Support (CARES)

306Student Union Building, (505) 454-3529, preventviolence@nmhu.edu

The Center for Advocacy Resources Education & Support (CARES) provides collaborative services and support to students who have experienced domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalk­ing. NMHU CARES also provides services and support for students who struggle with suicide or have had past suicidal ideation. Our program also supports students who are facing substance abuse issues. Services include advocacy, counseling referrals, academic and housing assistance, and student discipline advocacy. Resources and guidance are provided to those who are supporting others.  The NMHU Center for Advocacy Resources Education & Support (CARES) provides edu­cational outreach and coordinates trainings for the campus community.

Cooperative Education And Internships

Felix Martinez Building, Room 230, 505.454.3048

The New Mexico Highlands University Career Services Program for Cooperative Education and Internships Program links employers who wish to recruit university students for cooperative education (co-op) positions, and internships with the students who seek these opportunities. These undergraduate employment programs often give employers early access to top candidates for full-time positions.

Counseling - Individual and Group

Teacher Education Building (TEC), 505.454.3564

Highlands University offers free counseling for children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families to help with problems related to abuse, addictions, self-esteem, relationships, anger, and other areas of life. The services are confidential and private and are conducted by graduate-level interns of Highlands’ Counseling and Guidance Program and supervised by a licensed professional counselor on the faculty.

Dining Services

Student Union Building, Room 117, 505.426.2153/505.426.2139

Dining Services makes meals and snacks available to both commuting and resident students. Commuting students eating in the Student Union Building may choose to purchase a la carte meals with cash, or sign up for a meal plan. Resident students are required to purchase a meal plan. Meal plans are available in the Department of Housing and Student Conduct at 505.454.3193.

Educational Outreach Services (EOS)

Sininger Hall, 505.426.2058, Toll Free 877.248.9854, skmaldonado@nmhu.edu

EOS provides regional telecommunications access and educational opportunities to all students and communities. EOS provides off-campus instruction, televised instruction (ITV) and web-based instruction. Help desk business hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

E-Mail

E-mail is a mechanism for official communication within New Mexico Highlands University. Highlands University reserves the right to access, review, and disclose information obtained through NMHU’s IT resources at any time in compliance with an official investigation. Official e-mail communications are intended to be used primarily for furthering the education, research, and public service mission of the university and may not be used for commercial purposes, illegal activity, or profit making. Students are expected to check their e-mail on a frequent and consistent basis to stay current with university-related communications. Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical. “I didn’t check my e-mail”, error in forwarding mail, or e-mail returned to the university with “Mailbox full” or “User unknown” are not acceptable excuses for missing official university communications via e-mail. For the complete student e-mail policy, please refer to the Highlands Student Handbook

Health Center

Stu Clark Building, 903 Baca Ave., 505.454.3218, healthcenter@nmhu.edu

The Student Health Center provides primary medical care to Highlands students and their dependents. The center posts a regular schedule with reduced hours during the summer semester. Highlands students can take advantage of the many services provided by the Health Center, including prescription discounts and a small per-visit fee for dependents of eligible students. The Health Center accommodates walk-ins, but scheduled appointments are preferred.

Housing and Student Conduct

Student Union Building, Room 328, 505.454.3193, housing@nmhu.edu

Life in the residence halls is often an important part of the total college experience. Students interested in making new friends, being close to classes, the library and on-campus activities, should consider living on campus in the residence halls. Students have a variety of choices when considering an on-campus residence. There are suite-style residences and more traditional halls with both private and shared rooms; something for everyone.

Apartments are available for students with families and, on a limited basis, to graduate, nontraditional and students 21 and older. All of our residences are equipped with a phone line, cable TV outlet and Internet connection, in addition to the Wi-Fi available throughout campus. Laundry facilities, lounge space and gaming areas are also a part of residential life at Highlands.

Students interested in living on campus must understand that the residence hall room and board contract is for the academic year (August-May), and their signature indicates an agreement to live in the halls for the entire academic year. Apartment contracts require a 30-day notice. The Department of Housing and Student Conduct will accept written appeal requests for contract release charges only for medical reasons supported by appropriate medical documentation or for a life-changing event that is catastrophic in nature and supported by appropriate documentation (please see contract release form for details). Financial and community behavior based requests will not be considered. All approved cancellations are subject to the cancellation refund schedule.

Highlands University offers a number of meal plans to students living on campus. A meal plan is required for all students living in the residence halls. Once meal service has started for a given semester, students wishing to terminate the meal plan must petition the food service director or his or her designate for approval of meal plan cancellation. Financial-based requests will not be considered, and ALL medical requests must be supported by appropriate medical documentation (please see cancellation form). An application is available at the Office of the Dean of Students.

Failure to participate in the meal plan does not release the student from this contractual obligation. All approved cancellations of the meal plan will be subject to the refund schedule. Please refer to the cancellation refund schedule for charges that you are liable for if your cancellation is approved. A schedule of room, apartment and meal plan rates may be obtained from the Department of Housing and Student Conduct and online. Students interested in living on campus should write the office of Housing and Student Conduct at Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM 87701 or e-mail Housing@nmhu.edu.

All Highlands residence halls are tobacco free.

HU Mobile

HU Mobile is a mobile application available for the iPhone or Android devices that provides maps, news, events and phone numbers for Highlands University. Students who sign in to HU Mobile can view their course schedule, notifications or grades. HU Mobile is available by going to the appropriate app store; downloading and installing the free Ellucian GO app Once the application is installed, choose New Mexico Highlands University from the university list.

International Education Center

Student Union Building, Room 311, 505.454.3372, international_ed@nmhu.edu

At New Mexico Highlands University, international students are an important part of our diverse campus community. Students from more than 30 countries, including Brazil, Canada, Cameroon, China, France, India, Italy, Jamaica, Mexico, South Korea, and the Ukraine, attend Highlands. The International Education Center is committed to providing international students with the individual support to succeed at Highlands University.

Library

Library hours are online at www.nmhu.edu/libraryvenues/hlibrary/Hours.aspx

Reference Desk, 505.454.3401; Administrative Office, 505.454.3332;

Circulation Desk, 505.454.3403; Government Documents, 505.454.3411;

Rio Rancho Library, 505.891.6914; Albuquerque Library, 505.232.6000;

Toll Free, 877.850.9064, ext. 3337 or 2275

The Thomas C. Donnelly Library offers the following informational services to Highlands students, staff and faculty: access to computers, e-mail and Internet, Ray Drew Gallery, loan of books and other materials, electronic research resources, interlibrary lending and borrowing, microfilm copying and printing, photocopying, public access catalog, online and in-person reference services, library instruction, special collections, and study facilities, The library is located on National Avenue, (just off 8th Street and National Avenue). A valid Highlands ID is required to check out materials.

Native American Services

Student Union Building, Room 306, 505.426.2049

Native American Student Services provides targeted support services for Native American students, including academic and financial aid advisement, collaboration with tribal educational offices, and sponsorship of the University’s Native American Club and American Indian Science and Engineering Society.

Self-Service Banner (SSB)

Logging into the secure area, Self-Service Banner (SSB) allows students to view their Banner information. SSB makes it possible to register for classes, add or drop classes (freshman register, add or drop classes in-person), view class schedules, view midterm and final grades, view unofficial transcripts; view charges and make online payments, view status of financial aid awards, view and update mailing addresses, use degree audit to track progress toward degree, and much more. Banner looks at exactly the same information that administrative offices use, so it is possible to verify schedule changes, payments, pay stubs and more. Some of this information is also available for viewing on our mobile app, HU Mobile (see above).

Student Services and Code Of Conduct

The NMHU Student Handbook, which is published each year, describes student services, the Code of Student Conduct and related policies and procedures. Administered by the dean of students, the Code sets the standards for expected behavior of students. Procedures for hearings, appeals, grievances and complaints of discrimination/harassment are outlined in the handbook as well as general information about nonacademic programs and departments. The handbook is available to all students.  It can be obtained from the Highlands University Office of Student Affairs, Room 260, Felix Martinez Building or it may be downloaded at www.nmhu.edu/Dean_of_Students/Student_Handbook.aspx. 

New Mexico Highlands University prohibits the use, distribution, manufacture, or possession of controlled substances on university property or as any part of any university activity.

The Highlands Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure is included in the Student Handbook For complete information on academic policies, consult the university catalog.

Students With Disabilities/Academic Accommodations

Students with a documented disability are eligible to receive appropriate and reasonable academic accommodations or auxiliary aids in accordance with the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Acts (ADA), the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1974 (as amended), and other laws governing the disabled. Accessibility Services also adheres to the professional code of conduct promulgated by the Association of Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). Students wishing to receive academic accommodations may provide complete documentation to Accessibility Services as early as possible each semester. It is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability, to provide appropriate documentation from a qualified professional identifying the disability and recommend accommodation, and to request accommodations. To receive academic accommodations during attendance at New Mexico Highlands University, each student may supply appropriate clinical documentation of his or her disability. Each student must also submit a completed Highlands University Accessibility Services Application packet and a copy of his or her class schedule. Copies of these forms are available from Accessibility Services.

Due to a limited supply of interpreters, deaf students must document their disability at least one month before the beginning of each semester. Highlands University is not obligated to provide accommodations to students who fail to document a disability in a timely manner. Accessibility Services is located in Room 110 of the Felix Martinez Building and may be reached at 505.454.3252 or via e-mail at disabilities@nmhu.edu.

Out-of-classroom accommodations are governed by the policy set forth in the previous paragraph. If a student needs auxiliary aids or services to participate in Highlands University programs, write to Accessibility Services, New Mexico Highlands University, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM  87701 or e-mail disabilities@nmhu.edu.

Deadlines

Students wishing to receive accommodations must completely document their disability with Accessibility Services before drop/add deadline for the fall and spring semesters. This is normally two weeks after the semester begins. For summer and other sessions, students must document their disability before the first day of regular classes for that session. Students are strongly encouraged to document their disability and meet with office staff as early as possibly to ensure that the appropriate accommodations are in place before classes begin. If a situation arises during the semester, accommodations for accommodations will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Any accommodations will be in effect from the date of application.

Conduct Notice

Students with disabilities are held responsible for the same university standards of conduct as students without disabilities.

Disability-related records, including medical records, are confidential material and will be protected in accordance with FERPA regulations. Records are only used to assist in providing appropriate academic accommodations to the student.

Service animals are welcome on campus provided they meet all legal requirements. Service animals that present a health or safety threat to the campus community (including cleanliness issues) will be banned from campus unless significant preventive actions are taken by the owner to ensure future compliance.  Students with service animals must be registered with Accessibility Services.

More information about the policy and procedures relating to services to students with disabilities is in the Accessibility Services Handbook, incorporated herein by reference. This handbook may be requested from Accessibility Services or may be downloaded from the Highlands University website, www.nmhu.edu/access.

TRIO Student Support Services at NMHU

Student Support Services at Highlands University, a TRIO federal program funded by the Department of Education, is designed to serve first-generation, low-income and disabled students by providing services that will help them succeed in graduating with a bachelor’s degree.  These services are:

  • academic advisement;
  • tutoring;
  • peer mentoring;
  • career exploration and assistance in selecting a major field of study;
  • assistance with completion and timely submission of financial aid forms;
  • assistance for students with disabilities;
  • educational, cultural, and social activities, events and field trips;
  • supplemental grant aid for eligible participants (contingent upon available funds); and
  • study skills and college success workshops and presentations.

The Student Support Services program has been in existence at Highlands University since 1971 and serves approximately 350 students each year. Students are served through completion of 64 credits and must have a 2.5 cumulative GPA before being exited from the program. Students with disabilities are retained in the program through college graduation.

Veterans Upward Bound TRIO Program at NMHU

Student Union Building, Room 325, 505-362-1937, efasanella@live.nmhu.edu, efasanel@unm.edu

The Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) is a UNM-Taos/NMHU cooperative TRiO program on campus designed to assist veteran students in obtaining a postsecondary education. The VUB offers free services to veteran students in the program, which include tutoring, college admissions aid, help with financial aid process, academic refresher courses, GED programs, book and academic stipends, as well as free school supplies.

Website

www.nmhu.edu

Highlands University’s website contains helpful information to the campus community and the public (campus directory, campus calendar, and online documents for forms and information). To receive help with using computers or setting passwords go to www.nmhu.edu > my nmhu >  Student Technical Help. Students can also view class schedules and upper classmen can add or drop classes, change address and other things in Self Service Banner. Students can also access student e-mail, which is used by the university for official communications.

Writing Center

Douglas Hall, Room 115, 505.454.3537, writingcenter@nmhu.edu

The Highlands University Writing Center welcomes all students, freshman through graduate, who want help with papers in any field. Come to the Writing Center at the beginning, in the middle, or near the completion of your writing. Tutors can help you explore:

  • your own ideas and develop a thesis;
  • how to organize materials effectively, how to summarize, paraphrase, and quote;
  • how to cite sources accurately;
  • how to understand and apply your instructor’s suggestions for revision; and
  • help you strengthen your grammar and punctuation skills.

The Writing Center tutors are experienced writers, often with professional publications. They are professors, instructors, and English graduate students skilled in advanced tutoring techniques and dedicated to the empowerment of independent thinkers and writers.

What’s here for you?

  • Tutoring in writing, reading, and Internet research;
  • A library of resources on writing and research documentation (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.);
  • Computers for word processing and research (available to students participating in our tutoring);
  • A welcoming place to craft your writing.
  • Open weekdays all day long with evening and Sunday hours.

The Writing Center is located in Douglas Hall Room 115, across the street from the Felix Martinez parking lot. Highlands University is an EEO/AA institution. For individuals with disabilities who need access or services, call 505.454.3188.

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Academic Policies and Procedures

Admissions

The application for admission is available on Highlands’ website: www.nmhu.edu

Undergraduate Admissions
Felix Martinez Building Room 160
505.454.3434/3439/3503
E-mail: admissions@nmhu.edu

For a complete description of the undergraduate admissions requirements, please refer to the “Academic Information for Undergraduate Degrees” section of this catalog.

Graduate Admissions
Office of Graduate Studies
Rodgers Administration Building, Room 108
505.454.3266
E-mail: graduate@nmhu.edu

For a complete description of the graduate admissions requirements, please refer to the “Academic Information for Graduate Degrees” section of this catalog.

Registration

Felix Martinez Building, Room 120
Las Vegas, NM 87701


505.454.3233   FAX: 505.454.3552
E-mail: registrar@nmhu.edu
www.nmhu.edu or toll free 877.850.9064

Registration Periods

Registration periods are announced for the fall and spring semesters and the summer session each year. The specific dates, locations, and procedures are stated online on the schedule of classes for each semester or session. The schedule of classes may be viewed online at www.nmhu.edu. Students should receive academic advising before signing up for classes.

Early registration begins on the date noted in schedule of classes and continues through the Friday before late registration. Online registration is available through our website at www.nmhu.edu. For additional information or assistance, call 505.454.3438.

Late registration extends from the first day of classes through Monday of the second week of classes in the fall or spring semester and the first week of classes in summer sessions. During late registration, the selection of classes might be limited because many classes will already be closed. For specific semester dates, refer to the appropriate schedule of classes.

Approved Schedules

Each student’s selection of courses is subject to approval by the assigned academic adviser. (See Undergraduate Degree Requirements regarding academic advising at Highlands University.) Requests for any exceptions to university academic regulations are reviewed by the Office of Academic Affairs for compliance with general university requirements. Students’ course selections are subject to review, and a student may be withdrawn from a class if enrollment in the class violates an academic regulation of the university (such as those regulating course levels and maximum loads).

Auditing a Class or Classes

Audited classes do not count toward any graduation requirements of the university and are recorded with an AU on the student’s transcript. Students registered for audited courses must attend a minimum of 70 percent of the scheduled class sessions.

Students who wish to audit must request this status at the time of registering for the class or through an official change to the approved schedule of classes. Changes from audit to credit or credit to audit may only be made with the instructor approval during the first eight weeks of a semester or the first four weeks of a summer session. Any changes after the deadline will require approval from the chief academic officer. The exact deadline for changing the credit/audit status of courses is stated in the schedule of classes for each term.

Changes to the Approved Schedule of Classes

Changes to a student’s approved schedule of classes may be made through the Office of the Registrar weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.  See the schedule of classes for additional information.

Adding and Dropping Classes

The first six days of a semester and the first week of a summer session constitute the late registration period. During this period, students may add courses to their schedule, either in substitution for a class or classes being dropped or as an increase in the number of classes. The total number of credits allowed is subject to limits stated elsewhere in this section.

During the first two weeks of the semester, students may drop classes. Tuition charges will be adjusted, and the course will not appear on the student’s transcript. After the drop period, students may withdraw from classes but may no longer add new classes or substitute different classes. Withdrawal from classes is allowed through the 10th week of the semester. For the last day to withdraw from summer term, refer to the online schedule of classes. The course(s) will remain on the student’s transcript, recorded with a grade of “W.” In addition, students will be required to pay tuition charges and fees on any classes in which they are enrolled after the end of the late registration period, even though they subsequently withdraw from them. (The late registration period is defined above.)

Any courses added to original schedule of classes throughout the semester might result in overload tuition charges.

Instructors do not drop or withdraw students from classes. It is the student’s responsibility to do so. Students who wish to drop or withdraw from all their classes must complete the formal procedure for withdrawing from school. Students who remain enrolled in a class after the deadline to withdraw will receive a grade (other than a “W”) in the class.

Re-Enrollment

Any student who has not attended New Mexico Highlands University for one semester or more (excluding summer) may submit a re-enrollment form. To be eligible to re-enroll for an upcoming term, the student must satisfy the following requirement:

  • Student did not attend any other college or university during his or her absence, earning 16 or more college credit hours.

If a student earned 16 or more credits from another institution during his or her absence from New Mexico Highlands University, he or she must reapply for admission at the appropriate educational level. Contract the Registrar’s Office at 505.454.3438 for more information. The re-enrollment form can be found on the Highlands University website at www.nmhu.edu.

Withdrawing from the University

If a student wishes to withdraw from Highlands University, he or she must do so officially through the Registrar’s Office. Students who are unable to personally appear must contact the registrar by phone, letter, e-mail, or fax to request assistance in completing the process of withdrawing. The last day to withdraw from classes is subject to change and is reflected in yearly academic calendars as well as published in the schedule of classes.

A schedule of deadlines for full or partial refund of tuition is published in each semester or summer term online schedule of classes. The refund policy is stated under Special Policies.

Regarding Tuition and Fees

If a formal withdrawal from school occurs within the drop period, no courses will appear on the transcript for that term. If a formal withdrawal occurs after the drop period, grades of W are entered for the classes. Students who leave school without completing an official withdrawal from school will receive grades of F for that term. The last day to withdraw from school may coincide with the last day to withdraw from class. For specific information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 505.454.3438.

Undergraduate Student Loads During a Semester

An average of 15 semester credits must be completed each semester, excluding summer, if a student is to graduate in four years. Some students take more than the minimum credits required for graduation, either for personal interest or because the major or minor programs of choice are lengthy. Students should plan their load carefully, considering desired speed of progress and minimum loads required for continuation of financial assistance and scholarships, and in consultation with their academic adviser.

The regular maximum load for undergraduate students is 18 semester credits. The school dean may approve a student’s schedule for an overload of more than 18 credits, provided the adviser recommends the overload, the student has a grade point average above 2.5 for the preceding semester, the student is neither engaged in formal extracurricular activities nor employed more than 20 hours per week, and the student is not on probation. No undergraduate student may take more than 22 semester credits hours.  

Undergraduate Student Loads During a Summer Session

The regular maximum load for undergraduate students in a summer session is nine credits. The school dean may approve a schedule for more than nine credits subject to the conditions stated above for overloads in a regular semester. No undergraduate student may take more than 12 credits in a summer session.

Undergraduate Full-Time Loads

For financial assistance purposes, a full-time undergraduate student is defined as one who is taking at least 12 semester credits in a regular semester and six semester credits in a summer session. Requirements for full-time status vary for scholarship recipients, but frequently exceed the 12-credit minimum.

Classification of Undergraduate Students

Classification of students is based on completion of semester credits and other criteria:

Lower Division:

Freshman: Fewer than 33 credits  

Sophomore: 33 through 63 credits  

Upper Division:

Junior: 64 through 95 credits

Senior: 96 credits and above

Reclassification of students occurs automatically upon completion of the prescribed number of credits. However, the chief academic officer may invoke the following additional regulations in assessing a student’s preparation to take 300- or 400-level classes: sophomore students must have completed English 111; junior and senior students must have completed English 111 and 112, satisfied the mathematics proficiency requirements, and filed approved major and minor forms.  

Graduate Student Loads During a Semester

Each student’s selection of courses is subject to approval by the assigned academic adviser and the dean in the student’s major field. Requests for any exceptions to university academic regulations are then reviewed by the Office of Graduate Studies for compliance with general university requirements. Students’ course selections are subject to review, and a student may be withdrawn from a class if enrollment in it violates an academic regulation of the university (such as those regulating course levels and maximum loads).

Nine graduate credit hours constitute a full load for graduate students; the maximum load per semester for full-time graduate students is 16 semester hours. For students with full graduate assistantships, the maximum load is 12 hours. A maximum of six hours is recommended for persons in full-time employment. Overloads will be allowed only in exceptional cases of demonstrated superior performance and must be approved by the adviser or school dean and by the chief academic officer. An absolute maximum course load is 20 hours of credit in a semester.

A full-time graduate student is advised against employment for more than 20 hours per week, including graduate assistantship service requirements.

Graduate Student Loads During a Summer Session

Graduate students may register for no more than nine semester hours of credit during the summer session; the recommended maximum load is six semester credits. Summer session students with six or more credits are identified as full-time students.

Students may not enroll in graduate courses in deficiency areas until appropriate prerequisites are completed. If a recommended prerequisite is at the 400-500 levels, the student may be permitted to take the 500-level offering, but the course will be required in addition to the minimum 32 credit hours needed for the master’s degree.

Course Numbers and Levels

Proficiency: English 106 is a proficiency course and the credits do not count toward the minimum 120 credits required for a degree, but do count in a student’s course load. Math 120 is a proficiency course that counts as electives toward the minimum 120 credits required for a degree.

Non-credit: Any course numbered 135N is a non-credit course and does not count toward the 120 credits required for a degree.

Lower Division: Courses numbered from 100 through 199 are freshman courses. Courses numbered from 200 through 299 are sophomore courses.

Upper Division: Courses numbered from 300 through 399 are junior courses. Courses numbered from 400 through 499 are senior courses.

Graduate Division: Courses numbered from 500 through 599 are for graduate students; undergraduate students may be enrolled in the same course under a 400 number. In this case, the graduate students in 500-level courses will be required to demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in the work. Graduate students must enroll in the graduate course number. No undergraduate course will count toward the graduate degree. Undergraduate students must enroll in the undergraduate course number. No graduate course will count toward the undergraduate degree. Courses numbered 600 or above are only for graduate students.

The following regulations apply to allowable course levels:

  • Freshman students may not enroll in 300- or 400-level courses.
  • Sophomore students may enroll in 300-level courses but not in 400-level courses.
  • Junior and senior students may take 400-level courses.
  • Only undergraduates with advanced standing and graduate students may enroll in 500-level courses. The 500-level course taken by an undergraduate with advanced standing will only apply to the graduate degree and not to the undergraduate degree.
  • Only graduate students may enroll in 600-level courses. No exceptions may be made to this rule.

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Grades and Grading Policies

This section states policies regarding grades given at Highlands University, computation of grade averages, academic warnings, and honors for academic excellence.

Student may appeal a final grade by completing and processing Grade Appeal Form available through the Office of Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Undergraduate Grades

The following grades are reported for undergraduate students at the university. As appropriate, they appear on midterm reports, semester or summer term grade reports, and transcripts.

A – Excellent

B – Above Average

C – Average

D – Passing

F – Failure

Graduate Grades

The following grades are reported for graduate students at the university. As appropriate, they appear on midterm reports, semester or summer term grade reports, and transcripts.

A – Excellent

B – Average

C – Poor, but passing

D – Failure

F – Failure

Some programs may have stricter scholastic requirements; students must check with their academic adviser.

Marks

The following marks are reported for undergraduate and graduate students at the university. As appropriate, they appear on midterm reports, semester or summer term grade reports, and transcripts.

W – Withdrawal from the Class. Regulations for the W grade are stated in this catalog.

AU – Audit. No credit is given for the course, but attendance is required in at least 70 percent of the scheduled class sessions.

S – Satisfactory. Used for proficiency courses and some developmental courses, some practicum courses, institutes, workshops, field project, and the completed thesis. Indicates satisfactory completion of course requirements.

R – Repeat. Used exclusively for developmental and proficiency courses. Indicates that course requirements have not been satisfied and that the course must be repeated to satisfy the proficiency requirement.

U – Unsatisfactory.  Used for proficiency courses and some developmental courses.  Indicates unsatisfactory in course requirements.

PR – Progress. Used only for thesis, field project, senior readings, and some practicum courses (and as a midterm grade for graduate seminar courses). Indicates that acceptable progress has been made. To receive a permanent grade of S, the student reregisters for the course until the course requirements are completed.

NP – No Progress. Used for thesis, field project, senior readings, some practicum courses, and as a midterm grade for graduate seminar courses to indicate that acceptable progress has not been made.

I – Incomplete. Given at the discretion of the course instructor only when circumstances beyond the student’s control prevent completion of course requirements within the established time. The student requests an incomplete in lieu of a final course grade from the instructor, whose approval is required. The instructor reports the I and files a form with the Office of the Registrar documenting the work requiring completion and other conditions.  An incomplete not completed within one calendar year automatically becomes an F for both undergraduate and graduate students. (The instructor has the option of setting a terminal date of less than one year.) Students should not reregister for a course in which they have an I; if they do so, the I will become an F at the time when a grade is awarded in the reregistered course. Students are responsible for tuition for any repeated course.

CR – Credit. Used only for transfer credits.

Undergraduate Grade Point Average

Following are the allowable grades and associated grade points for undergraduate students:

A = 4.00   B = 3.00   C = 2.00   D = 1.00   F = 0.0

The sum of the earned quality points is divided by the number of credits to calculate the grade point average (GPA). The following is a sample calculation:

A student earns the following grades in five classes during a certain semester:

4 hrs. A = 16.0 pts.

6 hrs. B = 18.0 pts.

3 hrs. C = 6.0 pts.

2 hrs. D = 2.0 pts.

15 hrs. = 42.0 pts.

GPA calculation is: 42.0 ÷ 15 = 2.80 grade point average.

GPA requirements are stated in subsequent sections.

Graduate Grade Point Average

Following are the allowable grades and associated grade points for undergraduate students:

A = 4.00   B = 3.00   C = 2.00   D = 0.00   F = 0.0

The sum of the earned quality points is divided by the number of credits to calculate the grade point average (GPA).

Repetition of a Course

A student may repeat any course, but will receive credit only once toward degree requirements and graduation unless otherwise noted in this catalog. The most recent grade received will be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Course Repeat Forms are available in the Office of the Registrar and must be completed by the student who is repeating a course. The student’s transcript will be coded to reflect that the course was repeated, and the cumulative grade point average will be adjusted. Repeat coursework may not be eligible for financial aid and students are advised to consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to repeating any course.

Midterm Grades

The faculty submits midterm grades for each student in each class to the Office of the Registrar in the fall and spring semesters according to the schedule announced in the online schedule of classes. (No midterm grades are submitted for short-term courses.) These grades are displayed for viewing by the student on the Highlands University secure website, www.nmhu.edu and HU Mobile. These reports serve to inform students and advisers of a student’s progress so any problems in class performance can be addressed. If discrepancies occur at this time in the student’s schedule of classes, the student should proceed immediately to the Office of the Registrar to correct the schedule. Midterm grades do not appear on transcripts and are not kept as a permanent record.

Honors List – Undergraduate and Graduate

Undergraduate students earning a grade point average of at least 3.5 within a semester with no incomplete grades, and 12 graded hours, are recognized by the chief academic officer. Honors are awarded in summer terms for the same levels of performance except students must complete at least six credits.

Graduate students who earn a grade point average of at least 3.85 in a semester with no incomplete grades included, and nine graded hours, are recognized by the Office of Graduate Studies on a published list, and receive a certificate of recognition. Honors are awarded in summer terms for the same levels of performance, except students must complete at least six credits.

Satisfactory Academic Progress - Undergraduate

Undergraduate students who maintain the minimum academic standards shown in the scale below will be considered in good academic standing and will be considered to have demonstrated satisfactory academic progress. Students must show evidence of satisfactory progress toward a college degree to avoid academic probation and dismissal, and to continue to be eligible for financial aid through most financial aid programs.

Cumulative Credit Hours Graded                  Required Cumulative GPA

1 to 32 undergraduate credits graded          1.75

33 or more undergraduate credits graded   2.0

Academic Probation - Undergraduate

Students whose academic performance in a given semester is not satisfactory, as noted below, will be placed on academic probation:

  • Freshmen must earn at least a 1.75 GPA.
  • Other undergraduates must earn at least a 2.0 GPA.

The probationary period is for one semester. To be removed from probationary status, students must earn a satisfactory GPA as noted. A student on academic probation at another university may be admitted to Highlands University but retains probationary status.

Academic Dismissal - Undergraduate

Degree-seeking students whose academic progress is unsatisfactory and who are placed on probation for two consecutive semesters are subject to academic dismissal and will be notified by the Office of Academic Affairs. The dismissal period may be for one semester or one calendar year. Students may appeal their dismissal to the Office of Academic Affairs. If the appeal is approved, the dismissal may be waived or shortened.

During the period of dismissal, a student may not attend classes or live in student housing.

Satisfactory Academic Progress - Graduate

Students who maintain the minimum standards shown in the scale below will be considered in good academic standing and will be considered to have demonstrated satisfactory academic progress. Students must show evidence of satisfactory progress toward a college degree to avoid academic probation and dismissal, and to continue to be eligible for financial aid through most financial aid programs.

Cumulative Credit Hours Graded             Required Cumulative GPA

1 – 9 graduate credits graded                   2.75

9 or more graduate credits graded            3.0

Academic Dismissal - Graduate

Academic dismissal is issued to students who do not meet the required GPA after being on academic probation for two consecutive semesters. Dismissals will be for one calendar year from the posting of semester grades. The Office of Graduate Studies will notify students of their academic dismissal immediately after semester grades are posted. To appeal one or more grades, the student must complete a Grade Appeal Form available in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Students may also appeal the dismissal itself to the Academic Affairs Graduate Subcommittee within 30 days of the beginning of the semester when the dismissal begins. If the appeal is approved, the dismissal may be waived or shortened to one semester.

During the period of dismissal, students may not register for classes, live in student housing or participate in student activities at Highlands University. No credit will be granted for courses taken at other institutions while under dismissal at Highlands University. After a dismissal, a student must petition for readmission in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Students suspended or dismissed from another institution are not eligible to enroll at Highlands University until they have served the suspension or dismissal period of that institution.

Academic Integrity

Highlands University is an academic community and, as such, is dedicated to the principles of truth and academic honesty. When a student commits academic dishonesty, the integrity and reputation of the university is undermined.

Academic dishonesty occurs when a student engages in any of the following activities on any graded exercise or examination:

  1. Academic Dishonesty:  Any behavior by a student that misrepresents or falsifies the student’s knowledge, skills, or ability.
  2. Plagiarism: The process of using the ideas, data, written work or language of another person and claiming it as original or without specific or proper acknowledgement, including, but not limited to, copying another person’s paper, article, computer or other work and submitting it for an assignment; or copying someone else’s ideas without attribution; or failing to use quotation marks where appropriate; or copying another person’s idea or written work and claiming it as original without acknowledgment of the original author or creator.
  3. Cheating: A student’s use of, or attempt to use, unauthorized notes, texts, visual aids, electronic devices, assistance, copies of tests, material or study aids in examinations or other academic work to misrepresent his or her knowledge, skills, or abilities.
  4. Collusion:  Secret cooperation between students in order to cheat or plagiarize. 
  5. Facilitation:  One student knowingly helps or attempts to help another student to violate any provision of this policy.
  6. Fabrication: A student submits contrived, altered or false information in any academic work product, exercise or examination.
  7. Multiple Submissions: A student submits, without prior permission, any work submitted to fulfill another academic requirement.
  8. Falsification of Records: A student alters a transcript or academic record, without authorization, or misrepresents information on a resume, either before or after enrolling as a student in the University, to unfairly improve his or her grades or rank or those of another student.

At Highlands University, academically dishonest students are subject to a number of punitive measures by instructors or the university. These punitive measures must be supported by documentation and evidence. Students found to practice academic dishonesty are subject to expulsion from Highlands University. Accusations of academic dishonesty may be appealed through the Office of Academic Affairs. Further guidance on academic dishonesty is available in the student and faculty handbooks.

Class Attendance

Persons whose names do not appear on the class list or roster are not registered for the course. Fundamentally, a person who is not registered has no relationship with Highlands University and is not entitled to any services including instruction, testing, evaluation, disability services, or submission of a grade.

Instructors may not permit students to attend classes without being registered. Students whose names do not appear on class rosters are to contact the Office of the Registrar to resolve the matter. Students can check online for the status of their class registration or enrollment.

Students are expected to attend all class meetings. Those who are absent because of circumstances beyond their control may be required to make up work missed during the period of absence. Excessive absences can adversely affect a student’s grade or result in an F. Instructors should make the policies on attendance in each class available in writing to students.

If a student’s conduct in class interferes with others, is disruptive of teaching, or is contrary to the established class practices, the instructor may ask the student to leave the class.

Scheduled Class Meetings

No change in the scheduled class days and hours may be made without the approval of the chief academic officer and the registrar, even though all students in the class concur in the change. Any temporary departure from the schedule is to be prearranged through the chief academic officer.

Room changes may be made by instructors only through the registrar and school/college dean. Instructors are not to change rooms without this approval. Classes are not to be transferred to private facilities. Students are not to register for classes that are scheduled to meet in overlapping times or days.

Final Examinations

The schedule of final examinations is listed in the online schedule of classes for each term. The exam schedule is also noted on the university’s website: www.nmhu.edu. The final examination period for each class is a part of the semester’s instructional time and is to be so used by the instructor of the course.

Any departures from the scheduled time or day for a final examination must be approved in advance by the chief academic officer. Faculty members are not to adjust the schedule on their own initiative, even though all of the students in the class concur in the change. If a student would experience a great personal hardship through attendance at a regularly scheduled final examination, the instructor of the course may agree to give an “incomplete” or to give an individual early examination. If a student fails to take a final examination, the instructor will decide whether the grade for the course will be an F or an incomplete. Each case should be decided on its merit. Circumstances beyond the student’s control should result in the I grade.

Independent Study or Independent Research - Undergraduate

Independent study and independent research courses are for individual work by a student under supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon between them. A form describing each independent study course is approved by the dean of the college/school in which the course is offered and filed with the registrar at the time of registration. The university offers undergraduate independent study and research courses under the numbers 390, 392, 399, 490, 492, 499, and, in some cases, 290 and 299. These are variable-credit courses offering students and faculty supervisors a choice in the extent of the project and the corresponding amount of time to be spent and academic credit to be earned.

The following regulations apply to undergraduate independent study and research courses:

  • To be eligible to take an independent study class in a given subject, a student must have a sufficient grade point average in courses in the field and have completed basic work in the field (as determined by the college/school) to demonstrate the ability to conduct an independent investigation. Permission of the instructor is required to register for an independent study course.
  • For each semester credit in the independent study course, the student should expect to spend at least four hours of work per week. Faculty supervisors must schedule at least a weekly appointment with each student doing independent study under their supervision.
  • A written report of the work completed in independent study must be one requirement of the course.
  • No more than four credits of undergraduate independent study may be taken in one discipline in one term, and no more than six credits may be applied toward any major or minor program.
  • Independent study courses may not be used to avoid an instructor of a regular course or to substitute for a regular course because of inconvenience or careless scheduling, to extend the number of credits in a regular course, to replace payments for a work assignment, or to permit a student to add credits solely to gain financial assistance or other scholarship eligibility.
  • Independent study courses may not be credited toward any core curriculum or proficiency requirement.

Independent Study or Independent Research - Graduate

Independent study and independent research courses are for individual work by a student under supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon between them. The faculty member’s permission is required at the time of registration for the course. A form describing each independent study course is approved by the dean of the college/school in which the course is offered and filed with the registrar. Highlands University offers graduate independent study and research courses under the numbers 590, 592, 690, and 692. These are variable-credit courses offering students and faculty supervisors a choice in the extent of the project and the corresponding amount of time to be spent and academic credit to be earned.

Policies on graduate independent study/research are stated in the Graduate Policies and Degree Requirements section of this catalog.

Directed Study Classes

Directed study courses are designed for an individual or a small group of students who need a particular course to complete their program of study and are under the direction of a faculty member. The faculty member’s permission is required at the time of registration for the course. The directed study form is to be approved by the dean and submitted to the Registrar’s Office at the time of registration. 

The content of the course and credits awarded may be that of a regularly offered course with the exception of core curriculum courses. Special circumstances under which these courses may be offered are:

  • the student(s) needs the class to graduate before the next time the regular course is to be scheduled; and,
  • a course substitution is not feasible.

Directed study courses are offered under the numbers 393, 493, 593, and 693. The title of the directed study must be identified on the form consistent with the course number and title that it will substitute for such as SPED 493 Classroom Management in Special Education. The course syllabus must be attached to the directed study form.

Practicum, Internship, and Field Project Courses

These titles are used for courses that students undertake with the joint supervision of a work-supervisor and a university faculty member, either at an on- or off-campus site. Often they are offered with a variable-credit option allowing students a choice in the extent of the work and thus in the amount of academic credit to be earned.

Registration in these courses requires permission of the faculty member who will serve as faculty course supervisor.

Testing Out of Classes by Special Examination

The following regulations apply to the testing-out procedure at the university. Permission to undertake the special examination is requested on a form available in the Office of the Registrar. The request must be approved before the special examination can be given.

Applicants for special examination must meet the conditions stated in A and B below:

A.  A student is eligible to apply for special examination to test out of a class offered at the university if the student meets one of the following conditions:

  1. A course has been taken with similar content, but credit has not been received for reasons other than failure.
  2. There has been private tutoring, e.g., private instruction in music.
  3. The student has had successful work experience involving extensive preparation in the field.
  4. The student has produced a work of recognized merit or presents other evidence of mastery in the field.

B. A student eligible under A above must also:

  1.  Have been a resident student at this university for at least one semester.
  2. Have at least a 3.0 grade point average in the field and at least a 2.0 grade point average in all previous university work.
  3. Limit the total number of requests for special examination to 12 credits. (Exceptions to this limit must be approved by the chief academic officer.)
  4. Obtain approval of the course instructor, the dean of the college/school in which the course is offered, and the chief academic officer.
  5. Pay a fee of $40 per credit hour for each special examination. Payment must be made prior to administration of the test.

Examination questions and the completed examination paper are to be filed in the Office of the Registrar.

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Student Records (Access to and Confidentiality)

Under the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), New Mexico Highlands University students have the following rights in regards to their educational records:

  1. The right to inspect and review their education records within a reasonable time, not to exceed 45 days, upon making an official request and obtaining an appointment to do so.
  2. The student may challenge inaccuracies or misleading statements contained in his or her educational records. Challenges must be made in writing and forwarded to the registrar.
  3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes exceptions without consent.  Exceptions are a school official with a legitimate educational interest, compliance with judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena, officials for audit or evaluation purposes, in an emergency involving the health or safety of a student or other person and directory information.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA.  Complaints may be forwarded to:

            Family Policy Compliance Office
            U.S. Department of Education
            400 Maryland Ave, SW
            Washington, DC  20202-5920
            800.USA.LEARN (800.872.5327)

Directory Information

Directory information at New Mexico Highlands is student’s name, address information, e-mail address, telephone listing, field of study, class standing, dates of attendance, honors and degrees awarded, full-time or part-time status, hometown, previous school attended, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, and height and weight of athletic team members. Directory information may be published or released unless the student has requested in writing that directory information be withheld.  Written requests from student to have directory information withheld must be forwarded to the registrar’s office by the last day of registration and will be maintained for the remainder of the academic year or until revoked by the student in writing.  In accordance with 14-3-15.1NMSA, Highlands University does not release directory information for commercial or solicitation purposes.

For specific information, please contact the Office of the Registrar.

Social Security Number

Social Security numbers are collected from prospective students for administrative coordination and record identification purposes only. The Social Security number is a confidential record and is maintained as such by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Change of Name

Students who need to process a change of name for their academic records must bring appropriate documentation (at least two types of identification showing the new name) to the Office of the Registrar. Examples of such documentation include: marriage certificate, birth certificate, and court order for legal name change, with a copy of state-issued ID card or driver’s license and or Social Security card with change. Name changes must accompany a written request for the change and will be processed only for currently enrolled students. For more information contact the Office of the Registrar at 505.454.3455.

Transcripts

The Office of the Registrar issues both official and unofficial copies of student academic records. Any student may request a transcript of his or her academic record, and it will be issued in accordance with the student’s wishes subject to all transcript policies. A fee is charged for all transcripts; however, an enrolled student is entitled to one free unofficial transcript per semester. The cost for each transcript is $5 for standard mail. All transcript fees are to be paid when the request is submitted. Students are advised that transcripts are not processed the same day; normal processing can take 3-5 days depending on the volume of requests, order of receipt, and occurance during the term.

To request a transcript, send a letter to Student Records, NMHU Office of the Registrar, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM  87701.We do not accept faxed transcript requests or send any transcripts by fax. The following information is required to process a transcript request:

  1. name (and other names that may appear on school records);
  2. Social Security number or student ID number;
  3. date of birth;
  4. approximate first semester and year attended;
  5. complete address where to send transcript, current address and current phone number;
  6. the student’s signature is required to authorize the transcript’s release.

Students may also request an official transcript online through our secure website, www.nmhu.edu/transcripts.  For specific policies and procedures associated with requesting transcripts, contact Student Records in the Office of the Registrar at 505.454.3455. Incomplete or ineligible requests will be not processed. The Registrar’s Office reserves the right to request additional identifying information.

Transcripts from other institutions sent to Highlands University for admission purposes are not copied or returned to the student.

The Registrar’s Office offers electronic transcript delivery. In partnership with SCRIP-SAFE International, New Mexico Highlands University can provide official electronic transcripts delivered through eSCRIP-SAFE to network and non-network recipients. To request an electronic official transcript, use the Transcript Request Form, fax or mail your request to the fax number or mailing address at the top of the request, and pay your transcript fee at the time of submission. Students with holds from Business Office, library etc. cannot receive or request any type of transcript official/unofficial until all obligations to the university have been met. If you have any questions regarding the delivery or authenticity of an electronic official sent from Highlands University via eSCRIP-SAFE or any of the information regarding your transcript request form, please call 505.454.3455.

Transcript Holds

Transcripts (official or unofficial) will not be released to the student or to any other person or institution until all the student’s outstanding obligations to the university have been paid or until satisfactory payment arrangements have been made. These obligations include, but are not limited to, loans, such as the New Mexico Student Loan Program, tuition and fees, and other charges. All financial arrangements are conducted in the Business Office, not the Registrar’s Office.

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Right to Petition for Hardship

Students are entitled to petition for relief of an unfair academic hardship brought about by any regulation of the university, when warranted by special circumstances.

There is a two-year statute of limitation, academic petitions received after a two-year period will be forwarded to the associate vice president of academic affairs for consideration.

Academic petition procedures are as follows:

1. Student must submit an academic petition to the Office of the Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs. All petitions must be typed.

2. The Office of the Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs is responsible for obtaining all needed signatures, such as the department chair and dean/director signatures.

3. Petitions are sent via university mail by the Office of the Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs to the members of the appropriate subcommittee of the Academic Affairs Committee:

a. All undergraduate petitions are sent to the members of the Undergraduate Subcommittee.

b. All graduate petitions are sent to the members of the Graduate Subcommittee.

4. Members of the subcommittee should respond in one week to the petition.  The ballot and all materials must be sent back to the associate vice president of academic affairs.  The associate vice president of academic affairs is responsible for tallying the votes and informing the student of the committee’s decision.

5. If a student’s appeal is denied, the student should be informed that he or she may make a personal appeal to the subcommittee. The student may bring witnesses to the hearing.  No witnesses may speak unless a member of the subcommittee asks them questions. At the hearing, the student will be asked to present evidence to support the petition.

a. It is the responsibility of the chair of the subcommittee to invite witnesses who may be needed to refute the academic petition. In the case of a grade appeal, the instructor, department chair, and dean may be invited to the hearing by the subcommittee.

b. During the hearing, witnesses are heard by the subcommittee, one at a time.  All witnesses should remain outside of the hearing until called.

6. After the presentations, the members of the subcommittee vote on accepting or denying the petition. This information must be sent to the associate vice president of academic affairs. This office is responsible for informing the student of the decision by the committee.  This is the last step of the petition process, as long as proper procedures have been followed. 

7. The full committee of the Academic Affairs Committee will not hear academic petitions unless a violation of procedures has occurred. In the case of procedural violations, the petitions should be brought to the full committee for consideration.

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Academic Amnesty

Academic amnesty will benefit undergraduate students who once attended New Mexico Highlands University but did not continue due to poor grades, which resulted in academic probation or dismissal. A student may return to Highlands University; and, once granted amnesty, his or her earlier academic record will not be used for computation of the grade point average (GPA). Academic amnesty makes it possible for a student to attain an acceptable GPA for graduation from college. Academic amnesty is not available to students who were expelled from Highlands University because of violation of the Student Code of Conduct, university regulations, or federal, state, or local laws. Students should consult with the Office of Financial Aid to determine if they will qualify for financial assistance during the academic amnesty period.

A student must meet all of the following conditions to be granted academic amnesty:

  • Took courses from Highlands University and then stopped matriculation for five years or more because of poor grades (GPA less than 2.0), academic probation or dismissal.
  • Applies for academic amnesty through the Registrar’s Office. A student can apply for academic amnesty only once. A student is readmitted to Highlands University on academic probation after application for amnesty is approved.
  • Completes the first 24 credit hours at Highlands University with a GPA of 2.0 or better.

Once the first 24 credit hours are successfully completed, the academic amnesty is granted, and:

  • all course taken during the earlier matriculation at Highlands University, even courses with a C or better grade, will be excluded from GPA calculation;
  • courses with a grade of C or better from the initial matriculation period can be carried forward as earned credit and used to meet degree requirements;
  • courses from the earlier matriculation period remain on the student’s Highlands University transcript, but the transcript will bear the statement “Academic Amnesty Granted.”

A student will be academically dismissed from Highlands for failure to attain a GPA of 2.0 in the first 24 credit hours after application for academic amnesty.

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Academic Information for Undergraduate Degrees

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

All students seeking to earn a degree must decide upon a degree objective and one or more academic specializations. At Highlands University, the academic specializations are called academic majors and minors.

Major/Minor: All degree-seeking students declare their specific academic field(s) through an official form, the major or minor form, which is to be filed with the Office of the Registrar after all required signatures are obtained. For the bachelor’s degree, this procedure should be completed by the time students enter upper-division status. Students should know that timely filing of the required major and minor forms may be made a condition of registering for classes or receiving scholarships or financial assistance.

Degree Check: Required at one or two points during each student’s time at Highlands University. Bachelor’s degree candidates are required to have a degree check at the beginning of their third year of studies. In addition, all degree candidates should have a final degree check prior to the start of the semester in which they plan to graduate. The degree check is an official procedure carried out by appointment in the Registrar’s Office. Degree checks are used to identify remaining requirements for graduation and are an essential step in responsible academic planning. Students who neglect the degree-check process too often learn of unexpected requirements near the end of their studies, resulting in a delay in completing their degrees. Students should maintain constant contact with the adviser of their major to ensure completed of the program of study.

Overview of Course and Program Requirements

This section conveys specific requirements for completing an academic program and qualifying for graduation. Students are responsible for knowing and following the correct procedures and for meeting the conditions established for their academic programs and progress at the university. The following summary is intended to supply a convenient overview.

For the associate degree: all course and program requirements are stated in the Academic Programs and Courses section of this catalog.

Bachelor’s degree: students must look in a number of different places to know the requirements for graduation. The requirements include the following:

a. Proficiency requirements: Many students will discover they have one or more proficiency course requirements. Students and their advisers will plan how they may best meet these needs, which should be taken care of as soon as possible.     Proficiency requirements are stated along with the core curriculum requirements.

b. Core curriculum requirements: During the first two years, bachelor’s degree candidates typically concentrate on completing many of the courses for the university’s core curriculum. The core consists of courses that give a breadth of exposure to the many important academic subjects essential to a university’s education. These requirements are listed later in this section.

c. Academic major and minor requirements: Bachelor’s degree candidates typically concentrate on their major and minor fields between the sophomore and senior years at the university. Each bachelor’s degree candidate selects an academic major and a minor or, in place of a minor, a second major. Some professional programs do not require a minor. Courses used in satisfaction of core curriculum requirements may be used also toward an academic major or minor if so approved.

d. General graduation requirements: Bachelor’s degree candidates must complete at least 120 credits with a GPA of at least 2.00 or better to earn their degrees. In addition, the university requires that at least 45 of these credits must be at the 300- or 400-level (upper-division courses). Students and their advisers should carefully monitor these requirements to avoid unintended delays in graduating.

e. Progress and performance requirements: Students must carefully monitor their grades and overall academic planning, including standards for academic performance and progress that must be met for continuation of financial assistance and athletic or academic scholarships. (These requirements are given to each student along with the financial assistance or scholarship award and are summarized elsewhere in this catalog.) The student also must be aware of academic requirements for minimum grade averages and the declaring of major and minor fields.

Academic Advising At NMHU

Every student seeking to complete a degree at the university is assigned to an appropriate adviser. Specifically, the adviser helps with the selection of courses that each student proposes each semester and also works on the student’s plans for an academic specialization.

When students decide upon or change their academic fields of study, they may be reassigned to a new adviser. Once students have declared their major, their advisers will be faculty members in the field of the major. The dean’s office of the college/school supervises the assignment of advisers. Students needing help in identifying an appropriate adviser should go to the office of the appropriate college/school dean.

Proficiency Course Requirements

(For New Mexico Common Core information, please refer to the “Admission to the University – Undergraduate” section of this catalog.)

English proficiency is demonstrated by:

  • A minimum English ACT score of 17, OR minimum SAT Writing score of 420, OR
  • ENGL 106 Reading & Writing for Inquiry (3)

Language proficiency is demonstrated by proficiency assessment or two semesters of a language other than English.

Computer proficiency is demonstrated by:

Proficiency assessment OR one of the following:

  • CS 101 Living with Computers (3)
  • CS 144 Intro to Computer Science (3) (CS, Math and Science majors)
  • CS 145 Object-Oriented Programming (3) (CS, Math and Science majors)
  • MIS 145 Microcomputer Applications in Business (3)

Mathematics proficiency is demonstrated by:

  • MATH 120 Intermediate Algebra (3) OR minimum ACT score of 23.

A student with an ACT score of 29 in English or mathematics will be awarded three credits respectively.

The core curriculum

Area I: Communications (9 hours):

  • ENGL 111 Freshman Composition 1 (3)

            OR ACT of 29

  • ENGL 112 Freshman Composition 2 (3)
  • MART 124 Beginning Speech (3)

Area II: Mathematics (3 hours):

  • MATH 130 Math for Elementary Teachers 2 (3);  Approved for Education Majors only
  • MATH 145 Introduction to Statistics (3)
  • MATH 140 College Algebra (3)

            OR ACT of 29

  • MATH 155 Applied Calculus 1 (3)
  • MATH 160 Precalculus (5)
  • MATH 211 Calculus 1 (4)

Area III: Lab Science (8 hours):

Choose two 100-level lab science courses, selecting not more than one from each discipline:

  • BIOL 110 Biological Perspectives (4)
  • BIOL 131 Human Biology (4)
  • BIOL 211 General Biology 1 (4)
  • BIOL 212 General Biology 2 (4)
  • CHEM 100 Chemistry for the Non-Science (4)
  • CHEM 211/215 General Chemistry 1/Lab (5)
  • CHEM 212/216 General Chemistry 2/Lab (5)
  • FOR 105 Ecosystems & Humans (4)
  • GEOL 101 Survey of Earth Science (4)
  • GEOL 105 The Planets (4)
  • PHYS 105 Elementary Physics (4)
  • PHYS 110 Survey & Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS 151 Algebra Physics 1 (4)
  • PHYS 152 Algebra Physics 2 (4)
  • PHYS 291 Calculus Physics 1 (5)
  • PHYS 292 Calculus Physics 2 (5)

Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (6 - 9 hours):*

Choose two to three courses selecting not more than one from each discipline:

  • ANTH 102 Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 103  Introduction to Physical Anthropology & Archaeology (3)
  • ECON 216 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
  • ECON 217 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
  • POLS 151 American National Government (3)
  • PSY 101 Psychology & Society (3)
  • SOC 152 Introduction to Sociology (3)

Area V: Humanities And Fine Arts (6 –9 Hours):*

Select three to six hours from humanities.

  • HIST 100 The Western World (3)
  • HIST 201 U.S. History to 1865 (3)
  • HIST 202 U.S. History from 1865 (3)
  • PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Select three to six hours from fine arts.

  • ART 100 Introduction to Art (3)
  • AH 310 Art History 1 (3)
  • AH 311 Art History 2 (3)
  • AH 340 Modern Art (3)
  • AH 380 Art of the Americas (3)
  • MART 26  History of Motion Pictures (3)
  • MUS 100 Introduction to Music (3)
  • MUS 101 Rudiments of Music (3)
  • MUS 311 Western Art Music to 1750 (3)
  • MUS 312 Western Art Music Since 1750 (3)
  • THEA 100 Introduction to Theater (3)

* Areas IV and V: The total number of credits must be a minimum of 15 credits.

Extended Core Requirements (5 hours):

  • PE 100 Fit for Life (2)

                   OR Physical Education (2)

This requirement is waived for eligible athletes. Athletes must still meet the 120-unit minimum degree requirement for graduation.

  • Literature - Choose three credits in literature offered by English or languages.

Minimum associate degree requirements

  • fulfillment of the general requirements for graduation;
  • total credits required: at least 64 degree credit hours;
  • minimum cumulative grade point average: 2.0;
  • fulfillment of the discipline requirements for graduation;
  • specific requirements for admission, proficiency, and courses as stated in subsequent sections of this catalog, listed under the school and discipline that offers the specific associate’s degree sought.
  • C or better grades are required in all courses listed as major requirements for the degree.

Minimum bachelor’s degree requirements

  • fulfillment of common degree requirements (both curricula);
  • completion of the university’s general education requirement (includes proficiency-course requirements, if required, and core-curriculum course requirements). See the core curriculum;
  • a total of at least 45 credits in courses numbered 300 or 400 level;
  • a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. No credits below “C” may be counted toward a major or minor;
  • C or better grades may be required for support courses in some majors and minors;
  • at least 120 total degree credit hours required for graduation.

Requirements for the bachelor of arts curriculum

  • one major of at least 30 credits;
  • one minor of at least 20 credits, or a second major, or a two-year degree.

Minimum degree requirements for the bachelor of science curriculum

  • one major of at least 30 credits selected from the list of approved B.S. degree major programs;
  • one minor of at least 20 credits in one of the fields of science other than the field of the major, or a combined science minor, or a second major in a B.S.-degree field other than the field of  the first major, or a two-year degree in a science field;
  • at least eight credits in mathematics, including Math 155, Applied Calculus I or Math 211, Calculus I.

Requirements for a second bachelor’s degree

A student who has completed an undergraduate degree and seeks a second bachelor’s degree must meet all requirements for that degree. Some of the work completed for the first degree will meet requirements for the second degree, with the following exceptions:

  • the student must complete a minimum of 32 additional semester hours of credit in residence at Highlands University following the completion of the first degree;
  • the student must meet all requirements of the major for the second degree;
  • students who earned their first degree at Highlands University may be required to meet any general education requirements different from those in effect at the time of their earlier enrollment;
  • students who earned their first degree at another institution will be required to complete any additional requirements to meet Highlands University’s general education requirements.

Pre-Professional Programs

Students can attend Highlands University to prepare for further studies at medical, dental, engineering, law, and other professional schools. The university offers pre-professional training in accordance with standards and requirements established by national professional associations for entrance into each profession.

The competition for entrance into professional schools is intense. Students are accepted who show promise of success in the profession (as indicated by aptitude and standard admission tests), who have demonstrated high achievement in academic performance, and who have completed the appropriate pre-professional work in colleges or universities.

Many pre-professional opportunities are offered at New Mexico Highlands University. Programs, such as the pre-law program, entail the satisfactory completion of an undergraduate degree, because the professional schools in these fields require a four-year degree as one condition for admission. For other programs such as pharmacy, students often begin professional studies after only one or two years of undergraduate pre-professional studies. Professional schools, including medical and dental, will admit students with exceptional qualifications before completion of a bachelor’s degree. However, they are more likely to consider an applicant who has already earned a four-year degree.

In developing the appropriate pre-professional course of study, it is advisable for students to become familiar with the specific entrance requirements of the professional school or schools to which they are interested in applying.

Pre-professional advisers at Highlands University are available to assist students in developing their professional plans. Interested students may contact the appropriate pre-professional adviser as soon as possible.

Students interested in pre-professional opportunities may consult the information available in other sections of this catalog. The pre-law option is described in the political science discipline in the history and political science department.

Pre-professional options in health and science professions are described among the program descriptions of the Department of Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

All of the degree programs offered at Highlands University prepare students to enter their chosen fields or to pursue studies toward an advanced degree and are designed to meet professional standards for their fields.

In addition, a number of degree programs are aimed specifically at preparing students for entrance into professions that require candidates to obtain a license or certificate after completing their required university studies, such as in education and social work. The program descriptions in other sections of the catalog give more detailed information about these options.

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General Graduation Policies

Catalog Changes

Students may graduate under the catalog requirements for the year in which they were enrolled for the first time in a degree-seeking program, providing they complete the graduation requirements within a six-year period. Students are responsible for knowing the rules and regulations concerning graduation requirements and for registering in the courses necessary to meet them.

However, this catalog is neither a contract nor an offer to contract between New Mexico Highlands University and any person or party. Highlands University reserves the right to make additions, deletions and modifications to curricula, course descriptions, degree requirements, academic policies, schedules, academic calendars, financial aid policies, and tuition/fees without notice. All changes take precedence over catalog statements.

While reasonable effort will be made to publicize changes, students are advised to seek current information from appropriate offices. It is the student’s responsibility to know and observe all applicable regulations and procedures. No regulation will be waived or exception granted because students plead ignorance of, or contend they were not informed of, the regulations or procedures. Questions on regulations and their interpretation should be addressed to the office or college/school in which the student’s major department is located.

Highlands University reserves the right to effect changes without notice or obligation including the right to discontinue or modify a course or group of courses or a degree program. Although Highlands University attempts to accommodate the course requests of students, course offerings may be limited by financial, space and staffing considerations, or might be otherwise unavailable. Likewise, there may be changes to a student’s original course of study. Every effort is made by Highlands University to inform students of changes to their matriculated degree and to provide appropriate courses to fulfill degree requirements. Students should regularly consult with their department adviser to register for courses necessary to meet graduation requirements.

Baccalaureate Graduation Honors

Graduation honors for undergraduate students are based on the quality of a student’s work during the entire period of studies for the degree. All coursework from any accredited university previously attended will be included in the computation of graduation honors.

To be eligible for graduation honors, a student must have been enrolled at Highlands University for at least 32 semester hours. The grade point average determines the honors award for summa cum laude a GPA of 3.86 or above, magna cum laude a GPA of 3.70 through 3.85, and cum laude a GPA of 3.50 through 3.69.

Appropriate recognition is given at the commencement exercises and on the transcript and diploma. Graduate students do not receive graduation honors.

Graduation

Students need to apply for graduation on a form available in the Office of the Registrar. A one-time, nonrefundable graduation fee is charged for each degree. Graduation is subject to completion of all requirements, and students are reminded of the importance of the final degree check. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 505.454.3436.

Commencement

To participate in the commencement ceremony, a student must be eligible to complete all degree requirements at the end of the spring semester or summer term.

Posting of the Degree

The degree earned will be recorded on the student’s transcript at the end of the semester when all degree requirements have been completed.

Graduation Residency Requirement

To be eligible for graduation under any curriculum or with any degree, students must be in residence on campus for one full academic year (at least 32 semester credits), including the final semester (at least 16 credits). “In residence” means enrolled in courses by any delivery method through Highlands University.

Undergraduate Academic Programs And Courses

Academic Programs and Courses

The undergraduate academic program at Highlands University is administered through the one college and three schools. Students and any others who need assistance or information about academic programs should contact the office of the dean of the appropriate academic unit. In this section of the catalog, the academic program is presented by discipline within each college/school. Program descriptions and instructional requirements are given for each discipline, and courses are listed alphabetically by discipline unit.

Symbols And Abbreviations in Course Listings

Courses are listed by course number followed by course title. Courses offered concurrently at more than one level are listed with a split number (e.g., 234-334).

The number in parentheses following the title indicates the number of credits for that course. When a range of credits is offered, the specific number of credits within that range is determined either when the course is scheduled or, for variable-credit courses (identified as “VC”), when each student selects an individually approved number of credits.

When there are numerals following the number of credits, it indicates a number of contact hours per week different from the number of credit hours. In this example, BIO 484 Hematology (4); 2, 4, the first number indicates lecture contact hours, and the second number indicates lab or studio contact hours. Their sum equals the total contact time. The total contact time may exceed the course credit hours. When no numerals follow the number of credits, the course’s contact hours per week match the number of course credit hours (with one hour comprising 50 minutes of meeting time).

Any specific prerequisites or corequisites are stated at the end of the course description. These are enforced by academic program advisers and by the faculty member teaching the course in question. In cases where specific course prerequisites are not stated, assumption of ability to perform at the appropriate level in that discipline is still made.

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Academic Information For Graduate Degrees

Graduate Policies and Degree Requirements

Graduate programs are administered by the offices of the deans through the Office of Graduate Studies. Graduate students will find program requirements for each graduate degree under the appropriate college/school listings in this catalog. Considerations from those sections and from the university’s general academic regulations, together with these regulations and requirements, should be followed carefully.

Some disciplines offer graduate courses that do not lead to a degree but can be used for certification requirements or to increase knowledge in a particular subject.

It is the responsibility of each student to know and to meet the various deadlines and requirements.

Graduate Degree Programs

Graduate degrees offered at Highlands University are the master of arts, master of science, master of social work, and master of business administration. Specific program descriptions and course listings are given in the section “Academic Programs and Courses.”

Performance of Graduate Students

Additional information for graduate students regarding the performance, enrollment, procedures, forms and program of study requirements can be found in Graduate Student Handbook, available on the website, www.nmhu.edu.

Probation/Suspension

Graduate students must maintain high quality in their coursework. Students must have a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the graduate courses listed on the program of study to receive a master’s degree. Failure to maintain a satisfactory average will result in probation or suspension. No course in which a grade below C is earned will be given graduate credit, but it will be counted in determining the grade point average.

Any student whose grade point average in graduate work falls below 3.0 in any semester will be placed on probation. Other conditions for probation may be established. Any student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.4 may be suspended. A student on graduate academic probation for two consecutive semesters may be suspended. Other conditions for suspension may be established. After one year, suspended graduate students may apply to the Academic Affairs Committee for readmission.

Approved Program of Study

An approved program of study must be filed during the first semester in which a student is enrolled in regular status. (A sample approved recommended curriculum or plan of study may be available from the appropriate college/school and/or department.) A student will not be considered a candidate for a degree until the program of study has been submitted and formally approved. The program of study, signed by the student, the adviser, the appropriate graduate program coordinator/dean, and the chief academic officer must include the following:

  • A total of at least 32 semester credits of 500- or 600-level courses of which at least 15 credits are at the 600 level. None of the coursework may have been used for another degree except for dual master’s programs, nor may a 500-level course be used for credit if the 400-level counterpart has been used for a bachelor’s degree. A course already taken may not be retaken for credit merely because the course number, title, level, instructor, textbook, or offering has changed. A course already taken may not be repeated as independent study.
  • No more than one quarter of the total credits in the student’s approved graduate program may be in thesis or field project, independent research, independent study, directed study, or any combination thereof.
  • Failure to file a proposed program of study during the first term may result in a delay of registration in the next term.

The following policies apply to transfer, workshop, and institute credits:

  • A student may transfer up to six semester credits from another accredited institution, provided that the hours were earned at that institution with “B” or higher grades, they were not used for another degree, were completed within the specified time limitations, and were earned in courses acceptable for a graduate degree at the institution where they were earned.
  • Acceptability of transfer credits will be determined by the appropriate discipline, the appropriate dean, and the chief academic officer. The request for transfer of credit must be submitted on a special application provided for this purpose (in addition to listing the hours on the program of study). These transfer credits will not be used in computing grade point averages to determine probation or eligibility for assistantships and graduation; however, transfer credits quality points are included on the transcript as part of the cumulative GPA.
  • The final eight semester credits (not including independent study or research) will be in courses offered in residence by New Mexico Highlands University. “In residence” means enrolled in courses by any delivery method through Highlands University.
  • No workshops or institute credits may be used toward a master’s degree. (They may be used for teacher licensure or endorsements.)

Upon approval of the program of study, the graduate student will be admitted to candidacy. Notification of the approval will be sent to the student, along with a list of courses and requirements to be completed before the degree can be awarded. These requirements may be altered with the formal approval of the student, the adviser, the appropriate dean, and the chief academic officer.

Time Limitations

All work applied to a graduate degree must be completed within five calendar years from the end of the semester in which the program was begun. Work accepted for transfer from other institutions must have been completed within this same time period.

Students who, for reasons beyond their control, are unable to complete the work within the prescribed time may petition the Academic Affairs Committee for an extension of one year, giving good and valid reasons for the delay. The appropriate dean should be consulted to make a recommendation as to the correctness of the course content in question. If approved, the student will be required to update the work by assigned readings and possibly by the preparation of a paper for each outdated course.

Any additional extension of time will require a testing-out examination on all outdated work as stated in the Testing-Out of Classes by Special Examination section of this catalog or retaking the outdated classes.

If a student whose coursework exceeds six years remains continuously enrolled for one hour of Thesis, Field Project, or designated exit document class, he or she will not be required to pay the test-out fee to establish currency.

The process of testing for currency will be the same as that for courses that are more than five years but less than six years old. If the student breaks the cycle of enrollment, then the fee requirement to test current will become effective immediately.

If all coursework, except for thesis, field project, etc., is more six years old, the program may develop a comprehensive examination instead of a per-course exam to test the student. The fee for this examination will not exceed $1,200.

Graduate Oral Examination

The master’s degree will be awarded at the first commencement following the satisfactory completion of an approved program of study and an oral comprehensive examination. Requests for the oral examination shall be made on the form available from the Office of Graduate Studies. Requests should not be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies until the time, date, and examining committee members have been established. Requests must be received two weeks prior to the scheduled date of examination. To be acceptable, an oral examination must be conducted by a committee of at least three members, two of whom must represent the field of the student’s program or concentration area and one from a different content discipline. The committee must be chaired by a member of the graduate faculty, and a fourth member may be a person with expertise in the student’s field but does not need to be a member of the faculty. The fourth (optional) member will be a voting member. If a student’s chairperson retires before the student has defended his/her thesis, the retired faculty member may continue to serve as the chairperson for up to 12 months after the official date of retirement.

The oral exam should: 1) test the candidate’s ability to integrate and present knowledge from a broad field of study; 2) include a defense of the thesis, field project, or publishable papers; and 3) be of sufficient duration to permit coverage of the field in substantial depth.

The committee conducting the oral examination may pass the candidate, fail the candidate, or require that the candidate give further evidence of preparation by taking a written or oral examination on all or any part of the matter covered.

Oral examinations may be held in the last semester in which course work is taken. All “incompletes” for courses in the candidate’s program of study must be eliminated before an oral examination is scheduled.

At the conclusion of the examination, each member of the approved committee, including the chair, will cast one vote on the candidate’s performance. The committee’s ruling will be determined by a majority vote. In the event of a tie, the candidate will have neither passed nor failed, and a second examination will be scheduled.

Students should make an appointment with the registrar for a degree check prior to the start of the semester in which they expect to complete the requirements for the degree. An off-campus oral examination may be administered only under exceptional circumstances, and with approval of the Academic Affairs Committee or the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Thesis, Field Project, and Professional Paper

The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be presented in proper form to the appropriate office before the end of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. A committee of at least three members must read and approve the thesis, field project, or professional paper before it will be accepted. The committee is the same as the oral examination committee. The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be defended in the oral examination. A draft of the paper(s) must be in the hands of the committee members at least one week before the oral examination.

The student must acquire the signature of the chief academic officer before submitting the thesis or publishable papers to the library. The field project candidate must acquire the signature of the appropriate dean. The field project or professional paper must meet the same internal review expected of thesis. The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be a report of an independent and original investigation done under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty with the advice and cooperation of the committee members and other graduate faculty. It is expected that editorial advice will be given to the student by the graduate faculty supervisor and committee members and that the student will rewrite the paper until it is worthy of being a part of the permanent library collection.

The usual letter grades are not given for Thesis (699) or Field Project (697). A completed thesis or field project will receive either an S (satisfactory) or an F (fail). Students who do not complete a thesis or field project during the semester for which they register will be given the grade of PR (progress) or NP (no progress). PR grades will be changed to S upon successful completion of the thesis or field project. Until the program is completed, students are to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis, field project, or designated course in each semester in which work on the program is performed.

A professional paper must conform to the manuscript style and format dictated by the appropriate discipline. Content of the paper will be evaluated by the chair and other members of the student’s oral examination committee. The student will have met the professional paper option upon completion of the internal review process. Binding and acceptance of the papers may occur after approval by the dean and the chief academic officer.

A thesis or professional paper must also conform to the guidelines and requirements posted on the library Web page, www.nmhu.edu/libraryvenues/hlibrary/Services/theses.aspx.  Final approval of the formatting must be granted by Donnelly Library.  A letter of transmittal sent from the library to the Graduate Office is required for graduation. A fee is charged for binding the two requisite copies for the library plus any additional copies the student wants bound.

At the end of the five-year limitation allowed by university policy for completion of a master’s degree, the student’s graduate program, including thesis or field project work, will be automatically terminated unless an extension has been approved by the Academic Affairs Committee.

Registration for Graduate Courses

All students registering for graduate work must hold advanced-standing, provisional, regular, or non-degree graduate student status. A regular, provisional, or advanced-standing graduate student is classified as holding degree-seeking status.

Each student’s selection of courses is subject to approval by the assigned academic adviser and the dean in the student’s major field. Requests for any exceptions to university academic regulations are then reviewed by the Office of Graduate Studies for compliance with general university requirements. Students’ course selections are subject to review, and a student may be withdrawn from a class if enrollment in it violates an academic regulation of the university (such as those regulating course levels and maximum loads).

Nine graduate hours of credit constitute a full load for graduate students. The maximum load per semester for full-time graduate students is 16 semester hours. For students with full graduate assistantships, the maximum load is 12 hours. A maximum of six hours is recommended for persons in full-time employment. Overloads will be allowed only in exceptional cases of demonstrated superior performance and must be approved by the adviser or dean and by the chief academic officer. An absolute maximum course load is 20 hours of credit in a semester.

A full-time graduate student is advised against employment for more than 20 hours per week, including graduate assistantship service requirements.

Graduate students may register for no more than nine semester hours of credit during the summer session; the recommended maximum load is six semester credits. Summer session students with six or more credits are identified as full-time students.

Students may not enroll in graduate courses in deficiency areas until appropriate prerequisites are completed. If a recommended prerequisite is at the 400-500 levels, the student may be permitted to take the 500-level offering, but the course will be required in addition to the minimum 32 credit hours needed for the master’s degree.

Course Numbers and Levels

Graduate Division

Courses numbered from 500 through 599 are for graduate students, although undergraduate students may be enrolled in the same course under a 400 number. In this case, the graduate students in 500-level courses will be required to demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in the work. Courses numbered 600 or higher are only for graduate students.

Auditing a Class or Classes

Auditing students attend a class but do not receive credit for it. Audited classes do not count toward any graduation requirements of the university and are recorded with an “AU” on the student’s transcript, subject to attendance at a minimum of 70 percent of the scheduled class sessions.

Students who wish to audit must request this status at the time of registering for the class or through an official change to the approved schedule of classes. Changes from audit to credit or credit to audit may only be made with instructor approval during the first eight weeks of a semester or the first four weeks of a summer session. Any changes made after the deadline will require approval from the chief academic officer. The deadline for changing the credit/audit status of courses is stated in the schedule of classes for each term.

Changes to the Approved Schedule of Classes

Changes to a student’s approved schedule of classes may be made through the website or in the Office of the Registrar weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. See the schedule of classes for additional information.

Adding and Dropping Classes

The first six days of the semester and the first week of a summer session constitute the late registration period. During this period, students may add classes to their schedule, either as a substitution for a class or classes being dropped or as an increase in the number of classes. The total number of credits allowed is subject to limits stated elsewhere in this section.

During the first two weeks of the semester, students may drop classes. Tuition charges will be adjusted, and the course will not appear on the student’s transcript.

After the late registration period, students may withdraw from classes but may no longer add new classes or substitute different classes. Withdrawal from classes is allowed through the 10th week of the semester. Refer to the schedule of classes for the last day to withdraw from summer term. The course(s) will remain on the student’s transcript, recorded with a grade of “W”. In addition, students will be required to pay tuition charges and fees on any classes in which they are enrolled after the end of the late registration period, even though they subsequently withdrew. (The late registration period is defined above.)

Any courses added to a student’s original schedule of classes throughout the semester might result in overload tuition charges.

Instructors do not drop or withdraw students from classes. It is the student’s responsibility to do so. Students who wish to drop or withdraw from all their classes must complete the formal procedure for withdrawing from school. Students who remain enrolled in a class after the deadline to withdraw will receive a grade (other than a W) in the class.

Graduate Academic Programs and Courses

The graduate academic program at Highlands University is administered through one college and three schools. Students and any others who need assistance or information about academic programs should contact the office of the dean of the appropriate academic unit. In this section of the catalog, the academic program is presented by discipline within each college/school. Program descriptions and instructional requirements are given for each discipline unit, followed by course listings.

Symbols and Abbreviations in Course Listings

Courses are listed by course number followed by course title. Courses offered concurrently at more than one level are listed with a split number (for example, 534-634).

The number in parentheses following the title indicates the number of credits for that course. When a range of credits is given, the specific number of credits within that range is determined either when the course is scheduled or, for variable-credit courses (identified as “VC”), when each student selects an individually approved number of credits. When no numbers follow this number, the course’s contact hours per week match the number of course credit hours (with one hour comprising 50 minutes of meeting time).

When present, the figures following the number of credits indicate a number of contact hours per week different from the number of credit hours. The first number indicates lecture contact hours, and the second number indicates lab or studio contact hours; their sum equals the total contact time.

Any specific prerequisites or co-requisites are stated at the end of the course description. These are enforced by academic program advisers and by the faculty member teaching the course in question. In cases where specific course prerequisites are not stated, assumption of ability to perform at the appropriate level in that discipline is still made.

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Updated 7/30/14

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